*Humidity at 65??? Is that to high!? UPDATE!*

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Tripp16, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Ok so after taking hte turnr with the eggs in it out for a few seconds and dumping all the excess water out the humidity has finally hit 35%..... My friend says this is waay to low??? Is this true?? [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2011
  2. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Anyone? [​IMG]
     
  3. txmel

    txmel Chillin' With My Peeps

    730
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    Jan 8, 2010
    boerne, tx
    usually the humidity is run, for me, around 35 % days 1-18 then is increased to 65 -70 % for lockdown and hatch, days 19 -21 hope this helps [​IMG]
     
  4. GrannysRoost

    GrannysRoost Chillin' With My Peeps

    650
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    May 4, 2011
    Casa Grande
    Did you calibrate the hygrometer? If you did and live in a humid area don't add water or so much, or maybe open a vent hole depending on your incubator to let it dry out a bit. Good luck! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2011
  5. Chick1043

    Chick1043 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 5, 2011
    Idaho
    Mine was around 60-70 through my whole hatch! All five hatched! :)
     
  6. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

    16,225
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    My Coop
    Quote:X2

    To calibrate a hygrometer you will need:

    1/2 cup table salt
    approximately 1/4 cup water
    coffee cup
    hygrometer
    large resealable freezer bag

    Place 1/2 cup of salt in the coffee cup, and add the water. Stir for a bit to totally saturate the salt. The salt won't dissolve in this amount of water; instead, the salt should have the consistency of wet sand.

    Carefully place the cup containing the salt/water mix in a resealable plastic bag. Place the hygrometer in the bag, away from the cup of salt and water. Note: make sure none of the salt/water mix comes in direct contact with the hygrometer, or the hygrometer may be damaged. Completely seal the bag.

    Place the sealed bag aside at room temperature for 8-12 hours. Pick a location free of drafts, out of direct sunlight, and away from heating or cooling vents. The temperature should be fairly constant.

    After being in the sealed bag for 8-12 hours, check the reading of the hygrometer. It is best to read it while still in the bag, since if your house air is dry the reading may go down quickly once you take the hygrometer out of the bag.

    The relative humidity in the sealed bag with the salt/water mix should be 75 percent.

    If yours is the adjustable type, adjust the screw or setting so that it would have read 75 percent. You will have to do this very quickly, or remember how much you need to adjust the setting (e.g. for mine, it read 72 percent when it should have been 75 percent, so I would need to set it ahead by 3 percentage points). You may want to put the hygrometer back in the bag for another 8 hours to double check your adjustment.

    If yours is not adjustable (like mine), simply make a note of how "off" your hygrometer reads. If it reads below 75 percent, you will need to add the difference to your actual readings. If your hygrometer read above 75 percent on the calibration, you will need to subtract the difference from your actual reading. Here are some examples to help:
    Case 1: after sitting in the bag for calibration, my hygrometer read 72 percent. It should have read 75 percent, so the difference is 3 percent. I will now add 3 percent to the readings I take on the hygrometer (e.g. in a tank) to get the actual relative humidity.
    Case 2: after calibrating in the bag, a hygrometer read 80 percent. It should have read 75 percent, a difference of 5 percent. I would have to subtract 5 percent from readings when using the hygrometer to get an accurate relative humidity.

    Remember: always give a hygrometer about 2 hours to stabilize before taking a reading, as changes in the relative humidity may take a while to register accurately on a hygrometer.
     
  7. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Quote:X2

    To calibrate a hygrometer you will need:

    1/2 cup table salt
    approximately 1/4 cup water
    coffee cup
    hygrometer
    large resealable freezer bag

    Place 1/2 cup of salt in the coffee cup, and add the water. Stir for a bit to totally saturate the salt. The salt won't dissolve in this amount of water; instead, the salt should have the consistency of wet sand.

    Carefully place the cup containing the salt/water mix in a resealable plastic bag. Place the hygrometer in the bag, away from the cup of salt and water. Note: make sure none of the salt/water mix comes in direct contact with the hygrometer, or the hygrometer may be damaged. Completely seal the bag.

    Place the sealed bag aside at room temperature for 8-12 hours. Pick a location free of drafts, out of direct sunlight, and away from heating or cooling vents. The temperature should be fairly constant.

    After being in the sealed bag for 8-12 hours, check the reading of the hygrometer. It is best to read it while still in the bag, since if your house air is dry the reading may go down quickly once you take the hygrometer out of the bag.

    The relative humidity in the sealed bag with the salt/water mix should be 75 percent.

    If yours is the adjustable type, adjust the screw or setting so that it would have read 75 percent. You will have to do this very quickly, or remember how much you need to adjust the setting (e.g. for mine, it read 72 percent when it should have been 75 percent, so I would need to set it ahead by 3 percentage points). You may want to put the hygrometer back in the bag for another 8 hours to double check your adjustment.

    If yours is not adjustable (like mine), simply make a note of how "off" your hygrometer reads. If it reads below 75 percent, you will need to add the difference to your actual readings. If your hygrometer read above 75 percent on the calibration, you will need to subtract the difference from your actual reading. Here are some examples to help:
    Case 1: after sitting in the bag for calibration, my hygrometer read 72 percent. It should have read 75 percent, so the difference is 3 percent. I will now add 3 percent to the readings I take on the hygrometer (e.g. in a tank) to get the actual relative humidity.
    Case 2: after calibrating in the bag, a hygrometer read 80 percent. It should have read 75 percent, a difference of 5 percent. I would have to subtract 5 percent from readings when using the hygrometer to get an accurate relative humidity.

    Remember: always give a hygrometer about 2 hours to stabilize before taking a reading, as changes in the relative humidity may take a while to register accurately on a hygrometer.

    Wow, I didnt know you had to do this.... [​IMG]

    Thanks alot! [​IMG]
     
  8. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

    16,711
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    Feb 19, 2011
    Massachusetts, USA
    I dry hatch, and use the RH for ball park numbers. Did you fill the wells with water? I found on my LG this made the humidity too high. I emptied the wells and in a couple days the RH dropped to 30-35.

    After that incident I only dry hatch; that means, only adding a little water as needed when down to 25%. I candle to make sure the air cell is developing correctly.
     
  9. Tripp16

    Tripp16 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2011
    North Carolina
    Quote:Yes I filled the wells. I will let them dry out and add some water until the humidity goes to where it needs to be. [​IMG]
     
  10. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

    16,225
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    Nov 18, 2007
    Florida
    My Coop
    Quote:Your humidity is too high, try lowing it The eggs need to loose a certain amount of moisture during incubation. If you initially incubate at a higher humidity then you can drown the chicks as the water accumulates in the air sack and when the chick pips the air sack it drowns. I used to incubate at around 50% humidity but have found if I keep my humidity down to around 35% during incubation and keep it around 75% during lockdown I get much better hatches. The plugs need to be out during lockdown. The eggs need the added airflow. If the humidity goes down during lockdown I put a straw in a hole and squirt a little warm water on a paper towel in the bottom of the incubator. The moisture will spread out some but that is ok. My hatches are or near 100%. Since I have been doing my hatching like this my hatch rate has went up and I have had 100% hatches which i never thought before was possible. Good luck on your hatch... [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     

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