Humidity in coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by mi2bugz, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know that adequate ventilation will help minimize humidity in the coop during winter therefor minimizing chance of frostbite. My question is...if on a rainy day it is 64 in the coop and 80% humidity and 60 outside with an 88% humidity is this an indicator of a possible problem coming in the winter with humidity in the coop? Just want to take care of it ASAP if it could mean a problem.

    Thank you!

    ~ Nicole
     
  2. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: Short of adding heat, there's little you can do to lower humidity below outside levels
    Personally I wouldn't be worrying about it unless humidity is HIGHER inside
     
  3. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's kind of what I though but wanted to double check. Thank you.
     
  4. MoonShadows

    MoonShadows The Jam Man

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    Don't mean any disrespect, but my first thought is this question reminded me of one of those math test questions we used to get in high school.

    If a train leaves Chicago at 12:10 heading towards NY at 70 mph and another train leaves NY at 1:15 heading towards Chicago and the distance between NY and Chicago is 800, when will the two trains pass each other?

    I never knew the answer to that one, and I don't know the answer to your question either.

    BTW...heat does not necessarily lower humidity...dry air lowers humidity. Heat and dry air are two different things.

    Just provide PLENTY of ventilation, and don't worry about the temperatures....unless you anticipate sub zero temps for a few days.

    You should have your location in your profile. It really makes a difference where you live in order for other members to help you with questions.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2013
  5. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. I didn't realize I didn't have my location :(. Will try to figure it out now :).
     
  6. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    1 person likes this.
  7. MoonShadows

    MoonShadows The Jam Man

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    My Coop
    Bear Foot,

    You are right. I had it backwards. [​IMG]


    mi2bugs,

    Just go to "My Profile" >> Edit Community Profile and you will see where to add your location. It often helps to know a member's location when giving an answer.
     
  8. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013
  9. RiveraPetSupply

    RiveraPetSupply New Egg

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    I am concerned with the humidity in my coop because the pine shavings seem pretty damp with poo. I have 16 hens in a coop that measures 12 X 12 X 5 feet. There are two doors at floor level and a vent at the top.. We have at least 12 inches of pine shavings and were going to change it after six months. But, there is starting to be an odor and I'm thinking the pine shavings will need to be changed after three months. Ideas?
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    What is your location? So folks can better help, read back on this thread to show you how to do that.

    Is there water getting into the coop from the weather, or spilling from waterers?

    Do you keep the bedding stirred up, especially any wet spots?

    Recommendation is for 1 square foot of ventilation per bird, what side of the coop the ventilation is located depends on your climate and prevailing winds, but most of it should always be higher than the roosts so any drafting doesn't effect roosting birds an night.

    Using a poop board under roosts really helps to make floor bedding last much longer.

    This article on ventilation is excellent, tho located in far north, it can apply to any location
     

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