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Hybrid won't leave nest, broody or not?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Shan30, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. Shan30

    Shan30 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 17, 2012
    Vancouver island
    So I have a rhode island x hybrid who is sitting in the same nest box every time I go into the coop and I want to know if she is broody.

    We also just acquired a barred rock who I'm beginning to think is an egg eater so is it possible that the hybrid is simply being protective of the eggs?

    If she is broody I was thinking of moving her to a nice quiet private nest with some fertilized eggs and hoping for babies. Has anyone had success with this?
     
  2. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Is she sleeping in the nest at night? That is a good indicator she is broody. If she sleeps in the nest two consecutive nights, I consider her officially broody and give her fertilized eggs to hatch!
     
  3. Shan30

    Shan30 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 17, 2012
    Vancouver island
    I beleive she has been but I will keep a close eye for the next few nights.

    If she is broody, is moving her to a separate pen going to disrupt her broodiness? I just don't want her babies to be attacked by the other 29 hens.

    Once they hatch how long should one air to put them all back together? Does mum usually protect them?

    I'm so clueless haha!

    Thank you for the info
     
  4. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    My Coop
    There is no "one size fits all" answer to that. My first broody went broody in a high up nest, so once I confirmed she was broody, I made a new nest in my grow out pen, and after dark, moved her, kicking and screaming, to the new nest. She popped right off it and started pacing back and forth along the fence of the grow out pen, looking for a way back to "her" nest. I went inside, shut the door and resisted the urge to check on her again until morning. By morning she was sitting on the fertile eggs like it was her idea all along.

    Other people have had the experience of moving the hen only to have her give up being broody altogether.

    After they hatch, I let Mum decide when it is time to rejoin the flock. The above mentioned hen, after hatching, seemed content in the grow-out pen for a few days, and then started pacing looking for a way out. I decided to let her try it, opened the gate, and she called her chicks to follow her out. The rest of my flock barely looked their way and certainly never bothered them. After supervising awhile, it was so peaceful, I left her to it. For a few weeks she took them back to the grow out pen at night to sleep but eventually she returned to the main coop, chicks in tow. It was the most seamless integration I could imagine as those chicks were part of the flock from the time they were only days old.
     

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