Hydrogen Peroxide in Water

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by dale_421, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. dale_421

    dale_421 New Egg

    2
    0
    7
    Jan 7, 2011
    Hello,

    Has anyone had any experience using Hydrogen Peroxide added to water to improve the health and productivity of hens?

    I've heard about it but haven't had much luck finding info for small flocks. Here's an article I found, (had to remove some of the address, the system wouldn't allow it):

    purewaterworksinc.com/index_files/poultryuses.htm

    but it talks about 35% hydrogen peroxide which is much stronger than the stuff from the drugstore.

    If it really works to help with preventing disease and boosting egg production I'd like to try it but wanted to check if anyone else has had any experience before I do.

    Thanks!

    Dale
     
  2. cybercat

    cybercat Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,353
    28
    203
    May 22, 2007
    Greeneville, Tn
    No do not give it. It is not good to take internal.
     
  3. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Very bad idea.

    Hydrogen peroxide, when placed on wounds repeatedly (OK for one time usually), inhibits wound healing.

    It is not to be taken internally.

    Just give them the purest clean water you can get. And then they will drink out of the mud puddles. [​IMG]
     
  4. NeeleysAVLChicks

    NeeleysAVLChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    959
    4
    131
    Aug 4, 2009
    Leicester, NC
    I think cybercat and ChickensAreSweet covered what I was going to say, except for... [​IMG]
     
  5. sgtmom52

    sgtmom52 Birds & Bees

    I do not know if this is healthy or not ~ but note that they are only using a very dilute amount of 8 ounces in 1000 gallons of water.

    I posted the link for anyone who wants to read it.
    http://www.purewaterworksinc.com/index_files/poultryuses.htm

    Drinking Water of Farm Animals: Use 8 ounces of 35% food grade hydrogen peroxide per 1000 gallons of water or 30ppm. If you do not have an injector, start out by using 1 teaspoon of 35% in the drinking cups at the stanchion. This same ratio is used for all farm animals: cows, pigs, poultry, sheep, goats, rabbits and birds: This process will increase the oxygen level to the blood and cells. Peroxide application into the well water or city water can best be accomplished by a metering device, which keeps the application more constant and thorough, although manual application can be a second best. The rule of thumb is 3 to 10 ounces of peroxide per 1000 gallons of water in a holding tank or stock tank, striving to maintain a 30ppm reading after application. In order to get a true reading of the amount of oxygen remaining in the water after application, use peroxide test strips, designed especially for this very purpose.

    Chickens: In the fall of 1983, over 1,000,000 chickens were given hydrogen peroxide in their drinking water because of the avian flu epidemic. None of these birds got the flu, but before the epidemic was over, 11,000,000 chickens had to be destroyed and were put in a landfill. A chicken farmer in eastern Ohio, with a flock of 20,000 egg layers, found that by putting hydrogen peroxide in their drinking water, the egg production went up 1,000 eggs per day.

    Turkeys: A number of turkey raisers throughout the US And Canada are using hydrogen peroxide in their drinking water. A turkey raiser in Canada put 20,000 turkeys on hydrogen peroxide. In the same growing time, they averaged 1.5 pounds more per bird, using 8.5% less feed and the mortality rate went down.

    Decontamination of Broiler Carcasses: Hydrogen peroxide was used experimentally at the rate of .5% to 1%. The carcasses were soaked in this solution for 10 minutes as a decontaminant for salmonella. The was done in the Netherlands and published in 1987 copy of Poultry Science, Issue 66, pages 1555-1557.​
     
  6. UrbanGrower

    UrbanGrower Chillin' With My Peeps

    113
    1
    91
    Sep 29, 2010
    West Jordan, UT
    Quote:No Joke! [​IMG]
     
  7. cabincrazyone

    cabincrazyone Chillin' With My Peeps

    477
    1
    111
    Dec 26, 2010
    NE Minnesota
    Before chlorine bleach was developed (1920s?) hydorgen peroxide was used for sanitizing, cleaning, and whitening clothes. Pretty much like bleach is used today.

    If you want to put something healthful in their water, check into apple cider vinegar. It has to be natural .... the word escapes me ... unprocessed .... there's a thread about it in this "Feeding and Watering" topic .... I'll be right back and edit in a link ....

    editing .... it has to be organic, not just supermarket shelf stuff ....

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=41321&p=1

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=522010
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2011
  8. Colonel

    Colonel Out Of The Brooder

    43
    5
    24
    Mar 19, 2007
    Florida
    Quote:At the risk of stepping on some toes here...

    Dale asked a specific question, but most of what I've seen here is opinions with nothing to back it up. Now, I haven't been using H2O2 long enough to be able to provide definitive results, but everything that I have read (other than opinions posted on forums) indicates that when used correctly, Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is both safe and effective in making sure that drinking water is safe. I have also talked with a friend who has been using H2O2 with his "kitchen flock" of chickens and his commercial goat operation. He is an enthusiastic supporter of its use. He owns and operates a very large scale commercial greenhouse operation (primarily floral greens), and he uses H2O2 for his plants. His study prompted him to start using it with his livestock as well.

    My own chicken watering system is based on a 35 gallon water tank on a 10' tower that gravity feeds drinking cups via PVC pipe run underground to each of the chicken coops. I used to use a Chlorox dilution recommended by the USDA (for human consumption!) to make sure that the chickens all had good, clean water. It is my belief, based on what I've read, that H2O2 is safer and more effective. Studies have demonstrated that H2O2 is much more effective at cleaning the organic growth from the inside of water lines (and presumably from stand-alone waterers) than bleach is, so that is what I have switched to.

    Hydrogen Peroxide is basically just a water molecule with an extra atom of Oxygen attached. It is fairly unstable, which makes it a powerful oxidizer - basically it "burns up" whatever it contacts. To say that H2O2 is "bad" without backing that up is misleading, at best.

    Opinions are fine, and if someone doesn't want to use H2O2 because it is not "natural", then that's fine. I admire those who take that stand and go completely natural. Just make sure that you aren't misleading others into thinking that your opposition to the use of Hydrogen Peroxide is based on hard evidence rather than just personal preference.

    Bottom Line: ALL evidence that I have seen indicates that, when used according to standard recommendations, Hydrogen Peroxide is a safe and effective additive to chicken drinking water. I use it for my own chickens, and know others who do also.
     
    3 people like this.
  9. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    Quote:At the risk of stepping on some toes here...

    Dale asked a specific question, but most of what I've seen here is opinions with nothing to back it up. Now, I haven't been using H2O2 long enough to be able to provide definitive results, but everything that I have read (other than opinions posted on forums) indicates that when used correctly, Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is both safe and effective in making sure that drinking water is safe. I have also talked with a friend who has been using H2O2 with his "kitchen flock" of chickens and his commercial goat operation. He is an enthusiastic supporter of its use. He owns and operates a very large scale commercial greenhouse operation (primarily floral greens), and he uses H2O2 for his plants. His study prompted him to start using it with his livestock as well.

    My own chicken watering system is based on a 35 gallon water tank on a 10' tower that gravity feeds drinking cups via PVC pipe run underground to each of the chicken coops. I used to use a Chlorox dilution recommended by the USDA (for human consumption!) to make sure that the chickens all had good, clean water. It is my belief, based on what I've read, that H2O2 is safer and more effective. Studies have demonstrated that H2O2 is much more effective at cleaning the organic growth from the inside of water lines (and presumably from stand-alone waterers) than bleach is, so that is what I have switched to.

    Hydrogen Peroxide is basically just a water molecule with an extra atom of Oxygen attached. It is fairly unstable, which makes it a powerful oxidizer - basically it "burns up" whatever it contacts. To say that H2O2 is "bad" without backing that up is misleading, at best.

    Opinions are fine, and if someone doesn't want to use H2O2 because it is not "natural", then that's fine. I admire those who take that stand and go completely natural. Just make sure that you aren't misleading others into thinking that your opposition to the use of Hydrogen Peroxide is based on hard evidence rather than just personal preference.

    Bottom Line: ALL evidence that I have seen indicates that, when used according to standard recommendations, Hydrogen Peroxide is a safe and effective additive to chicken drinking water. I use it for my own chickens, and know others who do also.

    +1

    When done properly H2O2 can be very useful, it is dangerous when used improperly (from experience on wounds and rats and H2O2 vs anitbiotics in rats)
     
  10. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Well, seems to be the final concentration used is .00002% H2O2... to put that into perspective, that is going to be 0.25cc, or half the volume of your annual flu vaccine, of peroxide per gallon of water. At that low concentration, plus the fact it breaks down into water and oxygen pretty fast... I don't think it's going to do any harm to anything not a single cell. By all means, DO NOT dip your finger into 35% H2O2, because I can testify it burns like heck even through a pin hole in a glove!



    But personally... I wouldn't use it in a small flock if you just have water buckets, it would make more sense if you have auto water systems with lots of tubes where things can grow.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by