1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

I am new, and have no idea how to deal with this.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by haneyhippiehens, May 6, 2016.

  1. haneyhippiehens

    haneyhippiehens New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    May 3, 2016
    Palestine, Texas
    Raising my first batch of chicks I had no problems. then my neighbors daughters class hatched some Buff Orpington chicks and soon brought them home. She came to me the day she got them with 1,000s of questions witch i answered to the best of my Ability but they got to big to fast for her to keep and asked me if i wanted them and i gladly took them in with open arms. Now, with my first batch i had no problems so when i brought them home and saw that there belly were supper dirty i tried to wipe them clean with only a luke warm hand towel there has been some improvement in the appearance but I'm wondering if its a illness or if not how can i prevent this from happening again and get there bellys clean.

    Please help,
    HaneyHippieHens[​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Chickenkeepr

    Chickenkeepr Chillin' With My Peeps

    205
    10
    76
    May 5, 2015
    Watertown, NY
    Well, I think she may have gotten jipped lol. Those don't look anything like my Buff Orpingtons did, but they look exactly like my CornishX meaties did! That would explain the getting so big so fast. Mine also had the same issue on their bellies because they would lay around all day. Try to put some super soft straw in with them.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Doc McCluckins

    Doc McCluckins Chillin' With My Peeps

    89
    29
    66
    Feb 3, 2016
    X2 on the breed mixed. I would be willing to bet these are meat birds. That would explain the fast growth and dirty bellies. You can try giving them more room and changing their bedding more frequently.
     
  4. Angie8eggs

    Angie8eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

    389
    17
    113
    Apr 17, 2012
    Oh man, they totally look like meaties. From my understanding meat birds come from a very light egg color off white or beigish..Orps are medium brown. Do you know the egg color?
     
  5. haneyhippiehens

    haneyhippiehens New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    May 3, 2016
    Palestine, Texas
    I have no idea, like I said they were given to me. When they are older I'll post some more so maybe I can get a breed or breeds. Either way I'm glad to have them. Although, could anyone give me an estament on how big they might get?
     
  6. Angie8eggs

    Angie8eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

    389
    17
    113
    Apr 17, 2012

    I was just wondering if there was a way you could ask the person who gave them to you, what color the eggs were. If they're indeed meat birds, they're life will be sitting on the their bellies and eating a whole lot to fatten up. That is their whole purpose in the short life they are given. My mom butchers hers within a few months. I am sorry if that is what they are. At least they will be in a loving place with you! :)
     
  7. Doc McCluckins

    Doc McCluckins Chillin' With My Peeps

    89
    29
    66
    Feb 3, 2016
    If they are in fact meat birds they should mature around 5-6 lbs. They grow so quickly and get so heavy that if they are not butchered at a fairly young age (2-3 months) their quality of life can begin to deteriorate. They may become unable to get up and down very well and will just lay around all the time. Their meat is really good compared to standard chickens IMO but I am a finicky about eating home raised chickens so we never get these anymore. Nowdays the only chickens that go from our coop to freezer are roosters that get aggressive. I don't usually mind eating them at all lol.
     
  8. Doc McCluckins

    Doc McCluckins Chillin' With My Peeps

    89
    29
    66
    Feb 3, 2016
    This was taken from Murray McMurray's website in regards to their feeding requirements sense their system is a bit different than layers.

    "We recommend on the CXR you start them on a 20-23% Broiler starter, after 5 weeks switch them to a 18-20% grower finisher. We also suggest taking their food away at night starting at 10 days of age. This can cut down on any potential leg problems."

    So maybe restricting their feed to only during the day will keep them from being so lethargic.
     
  9. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,182
    255
    211
    Jul 18, 2013
    Pennsylvania
    You can also give them as big a space as possible and put the food at one end and the water at the other so they have to walk back and forth between the two and get some exercise. They can't just lay there and reach for the food and water. If you live where it is warm enough and can get them outside on grass that can help, too.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2016
  10. pattyhen

    pattyhen Chicks Ducks oh my

    3,047
    313
    321
    Apr 20, 2007
    I got the cornish x to by mistake. I agree get them out on the grass and let them have as much exerise as possible. Restrict the food because they will over eat. Their bodies grow so fast and their organs can not keep up with them. Mine became lame at 4 months old even tho she run with the other chickens but she couldn't keep up. She died when she was 9 months old probably from a heart attack. She was a sweet and gentle hen.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by