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I am rescuing birds in a poorly managed environment, Help!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by GrannyJanny, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. GrannyJanny

    GrannyJanny New Egg

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    Hello, I am taking five hens in today that a neighbor was not prepared to care for properly. They have are young, about a year old, and have lived in an inadequite coop with a tarp as a wind block. All seem healthy. They were brought into the neighbors bathroom 2 days ago, because of the extreme wind chills.They are bringing them to me now. It is currently 26 degrees.Tonights low will be in the teens. My coop is well insulated.
    My question is this, will introducing them into my flock tonight be too much of an extreme temperature change from being brought into the house? I can keep them in a garage( probably 10 degrees warmer than the outside) until this weekend when the temps will be 30s/40s. Thank you for any advice you may have!!
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    The temp change probably won't be an issue if they have lived outdoors; most likely your house felt too warm to them. But there are other, more important considerations -- particularly the possibility of disease. Here is a good article about bringing in new chickens:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/adding-to-your-flock
     
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  3. chfite

    chfite Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They should be quarantined to prevent the spread of disease.

    Chris
     
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  4. clucky3255

    clucky3255 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't know what to do. But I hope somebody can give you advise.:) Sorry
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. clucky3255

    clucky3255 Chillin' With My Peeps

    The main thing that you should think of is how you introduce them to your flock! You maybe could put them in at night because then the chickens would wake-up to them and their would be less squaking.
     
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  6. AVintageLife

    AVintageLife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You need to set up something in the garage and keep them away from your flock. Even though they seem to look healthy, I'd inspect each one carefully: eyes, nostrils, legs, feet, butts and skin. If the previous owners weren't able to house them properly, they probably weren't able to tend to them properly in other ways. Personally I would quarantine for thirty days before introducing to my flock.
     
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  7. GrannyJanny

    GrannyJanny New Egg

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    Jan 23, 2013
    Thank you! Great info:)
     
  8. GrannyJanny

    GrannyJanny New Egg

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    Jan 23, 2013
    They are set up in the garage now, all are fat and happy. I saw no lice or obvious signs of illness, but I appreciate the advice on quarantine for 30 days and on introducing to my girls in the evening. Thank you all for your quick responses to my little crisis, it is great to meet some other chicken lovers:)
     
  9. AVintageLife

    AVintageLife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good luck, it's a wonderful thing you are doing!
     
  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I agree on points concerning quarantine / health issues as well as temperature outdoors not likely to be a problem. Additionally, biggest stressor from new birds point of view will be the introduction in with the established flock. The birds you already have will treat the new comers roughly if they can and fights will likely start immediately after introduction. Usually such strife is not a problem but should monitored never the less. You can make problem worse by either not enough or too much intervention. Should prove a learning experience if you have never introduced birds to each other with one group having a home court advantage.
     

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