I am surprised so many hatch this late in the year

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by jmc, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    Maybe Gail Damerow is wrong, but i suspect she isn't..............

    She says, and i am sure she isn't inventing this, that chicks that are coming into maturity during increasing daylength, like birds hatched in the last half of the year, tend to start laying TOO EARLY resulting in greater incidence of prolapse, etc.

    Whereas birds hatched earlier in the year, come into sexual maturity during DECREASING daylength (i.e. right after June 21) and are less likely to have this problem.

    It is not that 'early hatched birds' will never prolapse; it is just that 'late hatch birds', coming into sexual maturity after dec 21 are more likely to have that happen.

    ANYWAY, just look at her book.

    I am just wondering at so many folks hatching chickens later and later in year.

    This is not a critique. I DON'T KNOW!!

    I'd just like to get some feedback
     
  2. rebelcowboysnb

    rebelcowboysnb Confederate Money Farm Premium Member

    I hatch all year with no real issues.
     
  3. BairleaFarm

    BairleaFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    917
    13
    141
    May 3, 2011
    Georgetown, KY
    Cold months dont bother me. I love fall chicks. Laying by late spring. Im getting ready to set a few eggs tomorrow. [​IMG] Now with this being my first batch this time of year ill have to see how they do but hoping all is fine.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    if you have her first book, you can see the last 4 lines on p. 124, and esp. the section 'lighting pullets' on p. 126

    she mentions the results being: smaller eggs (overall?), fewer eggs (overall?), and again, the greater danger of prolapse due to hastening of sexual maturity.

    IDK, just wanted to mention. It seems interesting and worth considering.

    BTW, Bairlea..........what do you incubate and hatch in?
     
  5. BairleaFarm

    BairleaFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    917
    13
    141
    May 3, 2011
    Georgetown, KY
    what ever i can find lol. Ive got a home made bator, a store bought 40 egg bator and a home made hatcher.
     
  6. KWAK

    KWAK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:hmmm i have had chicks hatch in the fall winter and have never hd problems with them, they lay normal eggs and lay the normal ammount...?
    ps. what is prolapse? I have never had a hen prolapse but always here people talking about it?
     
  7. pete55

    pete55 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,743
    76
    171
    Feb 19, 2011
    Suffolk, UK
    I've not heard of the dangers of prolaspe (where the bird straining pushes out the lower section of the oviduct) in late reared birds. In the UK a lot of breeders avoid rearing stock late in the year as the youngsters do not benefit from rearing outdoors in the summer months. However many have very good indoor rearing facilites. I think the main point she is making is that when rearing with natural cycles/seasons the birds bodies are matured by the following Spring and better able to cope with the additional stresses of the breeding season. However thats just my take on this discussion.

    Personally I would avoid rearing any geese in the fall as they benefit from grazing in the Summer months whilst they build a sound framework and grow.

    Pete [​IMG]
     
  8. instar8

    instar8 Chillin' With My Peeps

    169
    3
    98
    Jun 30, 2011
    N.IN
    All the birds i've hatched start laying at 20 weeks no matter the season. my very first chicks started laying day after Thanksgiving, at 20 weeks, right when they were supposed to. Can they even make eggs before then?
     
  9. Quote:Hi! Can you tell me where you found those yellow egg trays? I need some.

    Late year hatches? I've been hatching year-round for a few years and never noticed any difference in egg size or vigor or ever had a prolapsed hen.

    ''...chicks that are coming into maturity during increasing daylength, like birds hatched in the last half of the year, tend to start laying TOO EARLY resulting in greater incidence of prolapse, etc.
    Whereas birds hatched earlier in the year, come into sexual maturity during DECREASING daylength (i.e. right after June 21) and are less likely to have this problem..."


    That may have just been her personal experience with her birds.
    Thanks!
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  10. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

    8,559
    132
    316
    Feb 24, 2009
    Strasburg Ohio
    I am all hatched out! I get so tired of brooding chicks by the time summer comes around, I'm DONE! LOL
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by