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I Can't Sell Them To Her

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by kuntrygirl, May 14, 2010.

  1. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Feb 20, 2008
    Opelousas, Louisiana
    I have someone who is interested in purchasing some of my muscovy ducklings. The ducklings are only 12 days old. While talking to this person, I found out that this person has a pond on her property that she wants to put the ducklings on. After asking a few more questions, I think that these 12 day old ducklings are too young to be taken away from their mother and released on a pond. I don’t think that there is duck housing for them to go into. This would be like releasing them to survive on their own with other adult ducks. I am very concerned. At this point, I will not sell my ducklings to her because I feel that I would be sending them off to die. My concerns are as follows:

    1. How can she ensure that the ducklings will have constant food (starter/grower, etc), being as though she does not live on this property?

    2. How does she know that the ducks won’t get into the pond and drown?

    3. How does she know that the other adult ducks won’t try to attack and kill the ducklings?


    What do you all think? Am I over-reacting? I just want to make sure that they go to a good home.
     
  2. classroomducks

    classroomducks Songster

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Fort Worth, Tx
    I dont think you are overreacting...12 days old they should still be in a brooder...i think all of your concerns are completely valid and I wouldnt send my ducks to her either.
     
  3. duck walk

    duck walk Songster

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    white springs, fl
    I think you are spot on...I would not sell them to that situation...it is a death sentance...much too young to be cut loose on a pond...
     
  4. stumble_n_mumble

    stumble_n_mumble Songster

    Nov 23, 2008
    Long Island, NY
    no way. you have every right to use discretion on who you sell your ducklings to. i am the same way when i sell my silkies and other mixed birds. it is a SERIOUS thing. i would not sell my ducklings to someone with a pond that she wants to put them on. maybe when there like 2 months or so. that's my input [​IMG]
     
  5. katharinad

    katharinad Overrun with chickens

    This woman probably wants to do a good thing, she just doesn't know the facts. Turning her away will make her go and purchase somewhere else. Please educate her about the feeding needs and warmth in the first month. Tell her about the lack of preen at this point. Invite her to see your ducks and warm up her heart to do the right thing. And mostly tell her about the mess they make, so she understands that there is more to them then just their cuteness.

    Katharina
     
  6. SED

    SED Songster

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    North West Alabama
    Tell her that you will brood them for her until they are ready to bo on their own. And she can purchase them after that period.
     
  7. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Songster

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    Charlotte, NC
    I agree with everything said already. You're quite right to be hesitant. And she probably really could use the education. I have a care sheet I send to all potential duck purchasers, so that's something to consider putting together. I'd be glad to share mine with you if you want to email me at heather at careyhead dot net. I don't mind folks borrowing it as long as you credit me.

    Good for you on protecting your babies. If all breeders were responsible like you, we'd have a lot fewer abandoned waterfowl in the world.
     
  8. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Opelousas, Louisiana
    With every question that I asked her and with every response that she gave me, my heart sinked deeper and deeper into my stomach. I had a knot in my stomach at the end of our conversation, as I thought about how was I going to break the news to her that she wouldn't be purchasing my babies. I was literally sick to my stomach. How could she just want to drop my babies off, watch them walk around, say how cute they are and then drive home. Heck, I have a hard time leaving my babies in their "protected" brooder outside in the yard in the barn with the mother, let alone releasing them into the wild. I'm very protective and cautious as to where my babies go and I won't just sell them to anyone. I ask tons of questions before I agree to anything. If something doesn't sound right, then I don't sell. It's not about money. It's about love, care and protection of all of my animals.
     
  9. Chickenmaven

    Chickenmaven Songster

    Feb 6, 2009
    Michigan
    I tell people "what I'd like to see."

    *I'd like to see a shelter for them.
    *I'd like to see them protected.
    *I'd like to see regular feedings.

    Don't be afraid to speak your mind! Don't be afraid to say no! I regret saying yes.... My DD & I are still sad about our decision, last year, to rehome a bunny with a flakey acting couple. I felt they were not up to the task & I kick myself - often - for not standing up and changing my mind.

    Trust your good judgement.
     
  10. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Songster

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    Charlotte, NC
    Just sent you an email. [​IMG] As for telling her, perhaps she can contact a waterfowl rescue group that has wild birds looking for a release site. Here in Charlotte there is an organization just like that--they rescue mallards and other wild birds and then seek safe release spots for them. Explain that you can only send your babies to homes where they will be protected and treated as pets, but that a rescued wild duck or goose might be a good match for her. If you feel up to it, you could find out where those organizations are near you and send her in the right direction. She might be mad about it but if so, remember that it's her issue, not yours. You're doing the right thing.

    Probably she'll appreciate your honesty and willingness to help her and your commitment to the safety of your birds. And if not, then her opinion isn't worth much anyway.

    Good luck--
     

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