I can't work this run out, got some ideas?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by R_Chickens, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. R_Chickens

    R_Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 19, 2011
    So I'm working on how to make this run...(bet you've never heard that before)

    I have a 100' roll of 1/2 x 1/2 hardware cloth, 4' high.

    I have a 12 x 10 wood coop that will have a pop door to the run.

    I was at Home Depot and saw 3x5 8' landscaping timbers that looked pretty good to me at $1.97 /ea. The are flat on the wide sides and I thought it would make a nice surface for attaching the fencing.

    I figure they would make good posts and top and bottom rails, too. With a single support in the middle between the top and bottom rails it should be pretty good.

    But I don't know how to attach the top and bottom rails to the posts and still keep them all flush on the outside?

    I don't want to spend $2-$10 each on brackets or have it look just thrown together ;-)

    Ideas, pics, perplexed looks all welcomed!

    Thanks for reading.

    - JC
     
  2. KDK1

    KDK1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    You could use 1/2" plywood gussets.
     
  3. R_Chickens

    R_Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Might work if I also put a block of wood under each of the top cross pieces, too (on top of bottom ones)

    I also should mention the ground is straight, but sloped.

    It would be nice to have the top rails strong enough to put the curved PVC pipe or something similar (as seen on BYC) to support the same wire on the top of the run. I want a roof, and am not real particular on shape, as long as it is effective and is up in the air a bit to allow us to walk into the run.

    More ideas?

    - JC
     
  4. DOnSoCalOC

    DOnSoCalOC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We built our run with JUST wire. 1"x2" mesh welded wire. Used "J" clips to attach all sides, even for hinging a door on. Covered the top with a tarp for now; when rainy weather comes we will put the green plastic corrugated top on. It was fairly easy to build and it is light weight. The bottom is staked into the ground on all sides.
     
  5. dbcooper02

    dbcooper02 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Note that landscape timbers are stained red. Although they are the color of treated wood they are not treated and will rot pretty rapidly where they come in contact with the ground. They probably will not make a good long term enclosure.
     
  6. fireguy56

    fireguy56 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi, First of all the "landscape timbers" you are speaking of from HD are CCA Pressure Treated for ground contact and should last for many years. As far as your question....I would pull string lines as square as possible using small stakes, measure often and use a square to layout your run ....well, square! Set posts no farther than 6' between, positioning the flat surface facing in/out and rounded side/side. then I would use 2' x 4" treated lumber and attach to posts with screws. The flat lumber will mate up with the flats on the posts nicely and bd easier for you to deal with. Cut the lengths of the 2"x4"s to fall on the center of each post and let run to the outside of the end posts. Use a level to keep everything running true. Now you can attach your cloth easily to the 2"x4"s with heavy duty staples or screws. Do it from the outside for more "push against" strength from critters. Make a simple framework for roof in same fashion. Hope this helps. The Pic I am enclosing will show the same principle, but I used 4"x4"s instead of timbers. But you'll get the idea. I also was fortunate to find the fence sections I used on Craigslist for $10.00 apiece. Good luck.
    Erik

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. fiddlebanshee

    fiddlebanshee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    But I don't know how to attach the top and bottom rails to the posts and still keep them all flush on the outside?

    I believe in traditional framing you would "toenail" them. But since I'm not partial to nailing, I have used a Kreg jig to make pocket holes and screwed them together. (the jig makes an angled hole near the side of the wood that butts up and then you drive a screw into that hole. I think you can do pocket holes and screws without the Kreg jig but it sure made quick work of it.​
     
  8. R_Chickens

    R_Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Great pics! Love the run. If only I could find sections like that for cheap [​IMG] I've been pouring over CL for a couple days, but no luck yet- at least not within 150 miles.

    I like the 2x4 on the outside of the post idea. 2x4 8' PT at HD is the same price as the landscape timbers.

    Thanks for all the input from everyone! Any more ideas, I can't get back to HD for a day or two.

    - JC
     
  9. turbodog

    turbodog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Very nice run Erik. You got lucky with finding those chainlink fence panels!

    As far as using landscape timbers for posts...I don't know. A lot of landscape timbers that I've used for their stated purpose tend to warp. Some warp pretty badly. But then, they were in contact with the ground and would tend to stay damp longer than if used as a post. For run posts they might work. They certainly have the benefit of being cheaper than a 4x4.
    Fireguy56 gave good advice on building a run using basic carpentry skills and should produce a nice job similar to his, minus the fence panels.

    Good luck with your project!
     
  10. DOnSoCalOC

    DOnSoCalOC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Very nice run! I can hardly wait until we have our land large enough for such. Right now we have a tractor run and coop so that the girls can move from place to place. They are still young so we only allow them out and about when we are in the yard with them. Our neighbors cats come into the yard and there are a few hawks/falcons that peruse the area (even though we are in the city).
     

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