I don't know what's going on with my rooster HELP

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ilovemychickens5110, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. ilovemychickens5110

    ilovemychickens5110 Out Of The Brooder

    15
    0
    22
    Jan 8, 2011
    One of my roosters had a very red neck, and now he is losing some of his feathers on his neck. I've been told that frost bite (which he could have, due to some black spots on his comb) could result in feather loss, but the red neck is worrying me.

    I can't post pictures because I don't know how [​IMG]
     
  2. my3jsons

    my3jsons Chillin' With My Peeps

    132
    0
    112
    Feb 15, 2010
    Oklahoma
  3. ilovemychickens5110

    ilovemychickens5110 Out Of The Brooder

    15
    0
    22
    Jan 8, 2011
    It looks pretty much like that, but his skin is very red too [​IMG] what are you doing to help your chickens?
     
  4. my3jsons

    my3jsons Chillin' With My Peeps

    132
    0
    112
    Feb 15, 2010
    Oklahoma
    Here is my post to another backyard chickener... there is a couple of links you might follow to help with your decision making. Good luck!




    OK, lets talk the difference between frostbite and favus! Frostbite looks like the area is dieing because the area has frozen. Favus begins with what appears to be white powder on combs and wattles and then begins to crust over in black. Mostly because the favus is eating into the flesh and causing it to bleed.

    Here is a link of frostbite pics... https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=3484665

    Here
    is a link of favus (ours-which was diagnosed by a poultry vetrinarian) https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=5437011#p5437011. Honestly, I posted when it first appeared and everyone said FROSTBITE! Now my entire flock has favus and I get to doctor 18 chickens everday for atleast 30 days.

    If you even think it's favus begin treating promptly!!!!!!! If there is a pharmicist close by he can order bigger tubes of generic monostat cream with an active ingrediant of miconazole nitrate 2%.

    Here is a link to a study I've found on treating favus... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8719227

    Worst
    case, if you're not sure contact your local county extension officer and see if they can help or point you in the direction of someone local. That's what I did and it's paying off.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by