I don't want to cull my cockrel, but...

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by monaname, Oct 3, 2011.

  1. monaname

    monaname Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, I got a rooster because I planned on free-ranging my flock and wanted that healthy added protection, but since my rooster is becoming a "man" he's turning into a real jerk. As I was walking away from the flock with some treats in hand, the little *&^%%$ whacked the back of my knee and drew a little blood, right through my jeans. Now, I know that I probably walked away too quickly and shouldn't have completely turned my back, but COME ON, I was giving you TREATs for crying out loud. Is there ANY chance this is just a hormonal phase, or am I going to have to grow eyes in the back of my head to keep safe?!
     
  2. tinychicky

    tinychicky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    next time he does that make your self look really big by spreading out your arms and chase him away. or another option is to pick him up and make him put his head down by cupping your hand over his head. take your hand away. if he lifts his head up, put it down again. keep doing that until he keeps his head down. do that at least once a day. good luck! [​IMG]:
     
  3. Blue

    Blue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There are a ton of threads on dealing with mean roosters, from kicking, to carrying, to eating, so a search will probably net you a treasure trove of advice on the subject. I have a sometimes ornery RIR bantam rooster, and kicking him usually only makes him angry, so I'm no authority on the subject. [​IMG]
     
  4. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Once roo aggression starts it is hard to get a handle on. Until he gets the idea that you are the unquestoned master of the yard he will most likely continue. Some roos can be broken of human aggression, but some don't ever seem to get it. In the end roos are a dime a dozen and there is no need to ever tollerate a mean one. Also, how much flock protection they give is questionable and their badgering of the hens if excessive can actually hurt egg production.

    Agree fighting them only makes it worse. tracking them down and holding them either under an arm, upside down or pinned to the ground I have had some success with.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2011
  5. ChickieBooBoo

    ChickieBooBoo Cold Canadian Chick

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    I've never been able to cure a roo of bad behavior, once they get it in their heads its pretty tough to get it out. There are several different things you can try, just do a search on the forum.

    The only solution thats worked for me though was the freezer. There are soo many nice roos out there looking for homes that you shouldn't have to deal with an aggressive one.
     
  6. monaname

    monaname Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Howdy neighbor! I'm in Ashby, MA. Thanks for the tip, but how should I go about getting a hand on him if he's trying to take me out? When it happened, I turned around and yelled at him. He stepped back a little and then prepared for another go. Since I grew up with horses, I know that you can't fix a problem with animals by being aggressive back, so I just eyed him close and we danced a little. Then he finally calmed down and I was able to continue about my business. I'm confident I can handle him, it's really my husband and 2 year old daughter that worries me. My husband has zero farm experience and a 2 year old just doesn't know better. Today the gang is in their run. I'd like to let them out, but I need a break from being harassed.
     
  7. darin367

    darin367 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    mean roosters taste better......
     
  8. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    To deal with a fighty chicken you need to think like one. When roos carry on they crow, fluff up their feathers, flap their wings and dance around. If you yell to his little brain that might be just like you are crowing, waving your arms is just like fluffing feathers and flapping wings, and dancing also an invitation to fight.

    I'd try quietly tracking him for a good 5 to 10 min, if you can catch him without a violent struggle then get him upsidedown or pinned on his back for a bit, then just a little tug on the wattles and a tail feater before letting him go so he knows you are able to put him in his place.

    I would have zero tollerance with a little one about, to an adult a spurring roo maybe results in a scratch or bruse on the leg, to a young child it could be a cut up face and stiches or a dammaged eye.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2011
  9. augustwest

    augustwest Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Howdy neighbor! I'm in Ashby, MA. Thanks for the tip, but how should I go about getting a hand on him if he's trying to take me out? When it happened, I turned around and yelled at him. He stepped back a little and then prepared for another go. Since I grew up with horses, I know that you can't fix a problem with animals by being aggressive back, so I just eyed him close and we danced a little. Then he finally calmed down and I was able to continue about my business. I'm confident I can handle him, it's really my husband and 2 year old daughter that worries me. My husband has zero farm experience and a 2 year old just doesn't know better. Today the gang is in their run. I'd like to let them out, but I need a break from being harassed.

    I'm in Lunenburg! I've had my share of rooster issues. I've made peace with a hormonal roo by moving him around the yard whenever I want, not letting him mate in front of me and just generally keeping him on his toes by trying to catch him. I'd be OK with a nice roo around.

    My 5-year old daughter is another story. She got flogged good by a 7 month old roo. He continued to chase and scare her until she was too afraid to go outside! Then he started in on my 7 year old. He was rehomed and is a gentleman with his new family. I of course told them what he was like at our house.

    We got a new batch of chicks this spring and ended up with THREE roos. One was fine with us, but BRUTAL to the hens. Another roo was great with the kids and hens, but contstantly fought with the other roos (he was also the easiest to place- so he went first). The third roo was lovely with the family, hens, dogs, cats, other roos, etc. However, he chased the heck out of my 5 year old while she was on her bike. He never made a move toward her while she was on foot, but that bike made him nuts.

    Over the past few days, I noticed that my daughter was acting very afraid around the roo and he KNEW it. He started charging her and making her scream. That was IT. No more roos.... all three gone in one week. Maybe when she gets older, we'll try again.

    My point is that I think that these roos pick up on body language we don't know that we're putting down. You have to be on your toes all the time and making a "statement" about being in charge (at least during this angry teenage stage). We'll stick with our docile hens for now.
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I have an aggressive 25 week old BCM roo who will bump into me or peck my leg when my back is turned. He has also done the same to my husband. I went after him a few times scaring my entire flock to death, and then I realized that looked rather silly and didn't end it. So, now I just go into the coop and I don't take my eyes off him, sometimes I carry a stick, and I tell him what will happen if he gets in my way, and amazingly I don't have trouble much now. He is a bit overly aggressive with the girls, and we are giving him some time to mature before we decide to put him on the bus to freezer camp.
     

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