I feed Purina chick starter untill 18 weeks...right?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by FRlEDeggs, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. FRlEDeggs

    FRlEDeggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 6, 2010
    Am I correct?
    Purina chick start & grow for 18 weeks?
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    If you are developing a laying flock, you have a couple of options. You can feed Starter for about 6 weeks, Grower from 6 to 20 weeks or first egg, then Layer. Or you can feed the combined Starter/Grower for the first 20 weeks or first egg, then switch to Layer.

    If you are raising chicks purely for meat, the food regimen is different. You fed them higher protein feed so they will put on weight faster, but that can be unhealthy for a flock that will become layers.

    These sites go into greater detail. Good luck!

    Oregon State - Feeding Chickens
    http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/html/pnw/pnw477/#anchor1132074

    Alabama - Feeding Chickens
    http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-1317/
     
  3. FRlEDeggs

    FRlEDeggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much! [​IMG]
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Start & Grow is made to feed until 18 weeks or the first egg, yes. I cannot get grower alone, only the combo starter/grower types here, so that is my only option except for perhaps game bird grower (Flight Conditioner by Purina).
     
  5. FRlEDeggs

    FRlEDeggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What confuses me, though, is how can the Purina chick starter/grower meet the nutritional values of both chicks 1 day old to 18 weeks old? Doesn't what nutrition they need change? It's my only option though, so I guess I'll have to live with it [​IMG]
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I guess it shows that it is not that critical to be exactly right. After all, if Mama was raising them in the pasture field they would not be getting a very controlled diet and they would do OK.

    There was another option I did not mention earlier, and that is Developer. I've actually seen it at my nearby Tractor Supply once. You can feed Developer instead of Grower, especially after about week 14. But I usually have Speckeldhen's problem. My Tractor Supply usually only carries the combined Starter/Grower too so I just make do.

    The Starter is formulated to give them more protein when they are very young to kind of kick start them, then the grower is lower in protein to keep them developing efficiently yet at a slow enough pace that their internal organs can mature enough so that when they start laying, they are pretty much ready to start. The combination Starter/Grower sort of averages these out. It may not be quite as efficient as feeding the separate feeds but it gets the job done.
     
  7. newTexan2chickens

    newTexan2chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 15, 2010
    I have been looking all over for flock raiser too and not having any luck. I had read that you could use that if you have a mix of laying birds and ones that are not quite ready.... I have not been able to find it so far. Out here in the country most folks just put them on layer once they are 12 wks and I have read that is very bad.
     
  8. herefordlovinglady

    herefordlovinglady It Is What It Is

    Jun 23, 2009
    Georgia
    i feed it till first egg. any thoughts on what to do about left over feed?
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:Keep feeding it until it is gone. You can either just keep feeding it straight until it is gone and offer oyster shell on the side if the egg shells are thin. If the egg shells are thick enough, the oyster shells are not required but it does not hurt to offer them. Or you can mix it about half and half with the Layer, again offering oyster shell on the side if the egg shells are thin. Don't be surprised if they prefer one over the other. Mine will eat the Layer pellets and leave the Starter/Grower crumbles behind so I mix the layer and Starter/Grower and don't refill until they have cleaned their plate.

    It is not an exact science. Some will start laying while others will be weeks away from laying. Some will process calcium better than others. They may be getting enough calcium from the grit if you live in limestone country and they free range, or if they eat enough hard shelled bugs. Some veggies and plants have calcium in them.

    If for some reason you are feeding medicated chick feed, check the label, find out what the "medicated" actually is, and check to see if the eggs are safe.
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    Quote:Keep feeding it until it is gone. You can either just keep feeding it straight until it is gone and offer oyster shell on the side if the egg shells are thin. If the egg shells are thick enough, the oyster shells are not required but it does not hurt to offer them. Or you can mix it about half and half with the Layer, again offering oyster shell on the side if the egg shells are thin. Don't be surprised if they prefer one over the other. Mine will eat the Layer pellets and leave the Starter/Grower crumbles behind so I mix the layer and Starter/Grower and don't refill until they have cleaned their plate.

    It is not an exact science. Some will start laying while others will be weeks away from laying. Some will process calcium better than others. They may be getting enough calcium from the grit if you live in limestone country and they free range, or if they eat enough hard shelled bugs. Some veggies and plants have calcium in them.

    If for some reason you are feeding medicated chick feed, check the label, find out what the "medicated" actually is, and check to see if the eggs are safe.
     

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