I feel sorry for my mean roo

Kidsandpets

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 16, 2011
13
0
22
Ireland
Hi, I've been reading this forum for months but this is my first post. I have a roo and 3 hens. I got the roo from my sister in law, so not exactly sure of his age but I'd guess maybe 2 years old. He recently started going for me and my 4 year old son. So today after another attack, I isolated him in a 6' x 8' run, within the bigger run. At dusk he got very stressed trying to get out to be with his girls in the main coop. I feel sorry for him, but I have to get rid of him, my poor son is too scared to feed the hens or collect eggs anymore. I'm going to try to rehome him. Is it cruel to keep him separated from his girls while I look for a home? I'm really not comfortable going into the run when he's loose, but I don't want him stressed out either. What should I do?
 

Pinky

Songster
11 Years
Nov 15, 2008
2,724
44
183
South GA
Quote:
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If it were my rooster, he would be dinner by now.
 

Kidsandpets

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 16, 2011
13
0
22
Ireland
Thanks for your replies. The kids are safe because they won't go into the run anymore, but I'm not enjoying my hens anymore because I'm anticipating an attack. I can't relax when I'm with them. I'll keep him isolated and rehome him.
Thanks again.
 

Nostalchic

Songster
11 Years
Oct 14, 2008
495
4
121
North Front Range Colorado
I'm sure you've considered this, but if you rehome a mean rooster, someone else is going to have to deal with him or - more likely - eat him. He's just doing what comes naturally, but most humans don't appreciate that sort of thing, and someone else is either going to get hurt, or hurt him trying to be "dominant", or just kill him and eat him AFTER he's undergone the stress of being separated from his hens, and then going to a new place, etc. If you can bring yourself to do it, I think leaving him with his flock until you're ready, and then quickly dispatching him is the most humane and ethical thing to do, and they do make a good meal. Just MHO.
 

CMV

Flock Mistress
10 Years
Apr 15, 2009
6,770
196
281
When I started with chickens I never had roos. In fact, I would likely still be roo-less if I hadn't got an accidental roo in a batch of sexed pullets this past year. When you have children it makes sense to keep only hens. My daughter is getting big enough now to fend off a nasty roo, but my roo is on notice and may end up in the pot if he gives her any grief at all this upcoming year. She greatly enjoys being around the chickens, but has to be very cautious around them since Z (short for Tetrazinni) showed up. She used to carry chickens around the yard, play with them, feed them, chase them occasionally, but can't do any of these things anymore. Z keeps the girls safe, but at the expense of a lot of fun we used to have with the girls.

Keep him isolated until you find a new home for him. He'll be fine until he goes.

Good luck.
 

Kidsandpets

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 16, 2011
13
0
22
Ireland
I know he's just doing what is natural for a roo. And he is very good to the hens, he'll herd them out of the rain, let them eat first, chase away birds that try steal their food. And even with only 3 hens he doesn't over mate with them either. I actually like him!
And yes I know I'm passing on the problem if I rehome him. My Sil is considering taking him back (she lost all but 2 hens to a mink) and she doesn't really go into her run too much, and of course i've told her of his behaviour. So he may just get to go back to his original home. But for now I think I'll keep him isolated.
 

sourland

Broody Magician
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
May 3, 2009
122,963
369,646
2,027
New Jersey
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Protect your child and yourself . The inconvenience he is now experiencing he brought upon himself. Many would have killed him so he's really lucky even in "solitary."
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