I found a neglected bunny on the side of the road! Help!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by wyandotte102, Nov 17, 2019.

  1. wyandotte102

    wyandotte102 In the Brooder

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    So driving home I saw a rabbit sitting on the side of the road. He was black and white and fluffy, and looked like a pet bunny. I went back and picked him up, and he literally jumped into my arms. I took him home and, under the instruction of my friend who has a pet rabbit, put him in a small puppy cage with coastal hay and shavings and a small dish with water. He is very skinny and has extremely long nails, and is dirty because he was in the ditch. It is super cold tonight and didn't want to rinse him. I left him in my shed with a heat lamp and a few pieces of fresh, rabbit-safe lettuce from my garden. I think he also has a little mange on his ears. Super cuddly and affectionate, but is skinny and neglected. I think someone abandoned him off on the side of the road, because he is definitely not wild. Despite that, he is bright-eyed and attentive, and even ate a little lettuce. He is cleaning himself a lot. I have never had a bunny, and have no idea what to do with him (and I checked, he is boy, and not fixed either). Anyone out there to help me with him? He is not eating any more and I haven't seen him poop or drink.
     
  2. sylviethecochin

    sylviethecochin Free Ranging

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    If it's cold and he was in a ditch, it's likely he's not thirsty. Free-range rabbits usually get enough water from grass that they aren't really concerned about drinking otherwise. It's also possible that he was raised drinking from a water bottle, and isn't sure how to go about drinking out of a tub. That happens.

    Rabbits, like chickens, are really very cold-tolerant. I don't think you need to worry about a heat lamp.

    Rabbits need hay more than they need feed (an ounce of feed per bunny per day being considered quite sufficient by many breeders) and a lot of lettuce is not good for them (large amounts lead to liver spots). Dandelions are better, if you have access to them.

    You want grass hay for a male rabbit. Orchard is good, Timothy's good. Alfalfa is bad. It's better for nursing mothers, because there are more minerals in it, which can lead to kidney stones in bucks.

    Bunnies can be litter-trained, and it sounds very much as though you have a former house-bunny on your hands. Just a thought.
     
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Great Horny Toads

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    I too wouldn't use a heat lamp. Bunny pellets and hay as mentioned is the best diet. I never feed lettuce.

    Sure would love to see pictures. :)
     
  4. Eggscaping

    Eggscaping Enjoying Life!

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    Bless you for your kindness!! How lucky both you and the bunny are for doing this. Bunny for not being left outside to be hit by a car, or killed by a predator, and you because, well...good karma for your willingness to help a fellow creature! Please do give us pictures!
     
  5. wyandotte102

    wyandotte102 In the Brooder

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    Update: He is doing okay. He ate the rest of the lettuce and a very tiny piece of banana (many online forums said that they were simple and basic for bunnies). He practically inhaled it. First thing tomorrow morning I will go get rabbit pellets from the feed store. Anything else I can feed him in the meantime? And what about cleaning him? He took care of his face and ears, but his belly is still muddy. Also thought I would mention that he was shaking just a little, even with the heat light.
     
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Great Horny Toads

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    The mud it will groom off itself. I wouldn't try to wash it. Rabbits also will eat grass, greens, and browse like willow branches. Since you are in Florida you may still be able to pick some stuff for him to eat.

    Shaking isn't always from being cold. It could be stress. Keep his diet simple as rabbits can get stomach problems when stressed, or a change in diet. He may just be reacting to his new situation.
     
  7. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician

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    You mentioned a problem with his ears. If there is scaleyness/crustiness in his ears he may have ear mites.
     
  8. Folly's place

    Folly's place Crossing the Road

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    If at all possible, get him to a veterinarian who sees rabbits soonest, to sort out what problems he might have. Internal and external parasites are very likely, given his previous lack of care.
    Good for you for taking him in!!!
    Bunnies are very cute and can be great pets, if not for you, for another person.
    Mary
     
  9. AltonaAcres

    AltonaAcres Songster

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    If he is shaking he may be in shock. Leave him alone until he acclimates!
     
  10. wyandotte102

    wyandotte102 In the Brooder

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    From your reply and pictures on the internet, I think he does. He also has a hole/puncture scar in his left ear; it looks like something bit him a while ago, probably a dog.
     

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