I hate Long beach ca

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances' started by BigB, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. BigB

    BigB Out Of The Brooder

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    I was moving some big plants around in my side yard where my girls have been for the last year and this lady up the street from my house saw my girls and called the city and now i am going to have to get ride of them all so sad
     
  2. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    Can you temporarily re-house them, and when the job is done get them back. If you had them for a year with out trouble, I am thinking that you just need to make it look like you have. I would also suggest getting involved with the city council and see about getting the law changed. Still I am sorry that you have get them a new home.
     
  3. BigB

    BigB Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 16, 2010
    I might try that i just don't know where i am going to put them for a month
     
  4. suburbanminifarm

    suburbanminifarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you quite positive that you aren't allowed ANY in Long Beach? You're in LA county and I know chickens are legal in LA......
    My brother lives in long beach, and he has a semi-feral hen who visits him and lays her eggs under his condo's stairwell. He eats her eggs and leaves her some treats.
    Could you try your fellow BYC'ers for a temp re-home? Or even Craigslist? Perhaps someone would be sympathetic. Do you have any friends who could house them for a month or so?
     
  5. tigerrrrrrrlilly

    tigerrrrrrrlilly Chillin' With My Peeps

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  6. desertdarlene

    desertdarlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You know, I was reading that law on that link and it actually says you can have 1 pet fowl as long as it's kept at least 20 feet away from any housing structure (I assume it counts your own home, but not sure). That's actually pretty reasonable for the average home owner. I would bet that you could keep at least one and find a temporary home for the other(s) while you talk to your city officials about it.
     
  7. BigB

    BigB Out Of The Brooder

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    that law is BS i dont know one house in long beach where you can get 50ft from you neighbors house and you own

    my hole backyard is not even 50ft

    so that law really says that you cant keep chickens in long beach at all
     
  8. desertdarlene

    desertdarlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, but if your yard is only 20 feet, you can have at least one fowl. I know that doesn't solve your problem, but maybe you can keep one, at least, and find a temporary home for the others while you work it out.
     
  9. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    I am sure that what you have is a Service animal that helps you with your condition. Hepa law does not require you to need to discuss what you condition is, but I am certain that you have a condition that requires the necessity of a service bird or 2. It isn't easy for just one bird to take care of all your needs you know. [​IMG]
     
  10. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    Quote:NO!!!

    FIRST: This is immoral
    SECOND: It makes it harder for people with REAL service animals to use them
    THIRD: BIRDS are NOT covered at all.

    Service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition. The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the handler�s disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing non-violent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors. The crime deterrent effects of an animal�s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of this definition.

    *****
    � 36.302 Modifications in policies, practices, or procedures.
    (c) * * *

    (2) Exceptions. A public accommodation may ask an individual with a disability to remove a service animal from the premises if:
    (i) The animal is out of control and the animal�s handler does not take effective action to control it; or

    (ii) The animal is not housebroken.

    (3) If an animal is properly excluded. If a public accommodation properly excludes a service animal under � 36.302(c)(2), it shall give the individual with a disability the opportunity to obtain goods, services, and accommodations without having the service animal on the premises.

    (4) Animal under handler�s control. A service animal shall be under the control of its handler. A service animal shall have a harness, leash, or other tether, unless either the handler is unable because of a disability to use a harness, leash, or other tether, or the use of a harness, leash, or other tether would interfere with the service animal�s safe, effective performance of work or tasks, in which case the service animal must be otherwise under the handler�s control (e.g., voice control, signals, or other effective means).

    (5) Care or supervision. A public accommodation is not responsible for the care or supervision of a service animal.

    (6) Inquiries. A public accommodation shall not ask about the nature or extent of a person�s disability, but may make two inquiries to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal. A public accommodation may ask if the animal is required because of a disability and what work or task the animal has been trained to perform. A public accommodation shall not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal. Generally, a public accommodation may not make these inquiries about a service animal when it is readily apparent that an animal is trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability (e.g., the dog is observed guiding an individual who is blind or has low vision, pulling a person�s wheelchair, or providing assistance with stability or balance to an individual with an observable mobility disability).

    (7) Access to areas of a public accommodation. Individuals with disabilities shall be permitted to be accompanied by their service animals in all areas of a place of public accommodation where members of the public, program participants, clients, customers, patrons, or invitees, as relevant, are allowed to go.

    (8) Surcharges. A public accommodation shall not ask or require an individual with a disability to pay a surcharge, even if people accompanied by pets are required to pay fees, or to comply with other requirements generally not applicable to people without pets. If a public accommodation normally charges individuals for the damage they cause, an individual with a disability may be charged for damage caused by his or her service animal.

    (9) Miniature horses. (i) A public accommodation shall make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a miniature horse by an individual with a disability if the miniature horse has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of the individual with a disability.

    (ii) Assessment factors. In determining whether reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures can be made to allow a miniature horse into a specific facility, a public accommodation shall consider--

    (A) The type, size, and weight of the miniature horse and whether the facility can accommodate these features;

    (B) Whether the handler has sufficient control of the miniature horse;

    (C) Whether the miniature horse is housebroken; and

    (D) Whether the miniature horse�s presence in a specific facility compromises legitimate safety requirements that are necessary for safe operation.

    (iii) Other requirements. Sections 36.302(c)(3) through (c)(8), which apply to service animals, shall also apply to miniature horses.

    This is just as wrong as parking in a handicapped space even for 30 seconds if you are not legally handicapped... kidding or not its not funny or a good idea to suggest someone might take you seriously.​
     

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