I have a couple of questions :)

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by olesmokey88, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. olesmokey88

    olesmokey88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay I've read up a lot on incubation and hatching and it seems that it's a lot harder now than it was when I was younger or maybe I was just careless when I was younger lol. Anyway I have a little giant still air out of 38 eggs I had none hatch it was my fault tho and I won't be using that bator again. I made my own out of a storage tote I am currently on day 7 just candled and I culled 5 eggs out of 32 3 infertile and 2 quitters . I've got the humidity and temp right on no water in bator until they pip then up it to 60-65 temp fluctuates between 98-100 constantly I have 4 thermometers and 2 hygrometers inside along with a little giant egg turner. I know it's a while before lock down but when I enter lock down do I just unplug the turner and leave the eggs where they rest or do I pull them out and lay them on there side ? The reason I'm asking is on my last incubation I had 9 make it to lock down and pulled them out of the turner and laid them on there side none hatched and upon eggtopsy they were all malpositioned so does anyone have any tips or tricks that have worked for them ?

    Thanks and any help would be greatly appreciated

    David
     
  2. CarolJ

    CarolJ Dogwood Trace Farm

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    My own personal experience has been the less I messed with the eggs during incubation (candling, etc.) the better the hatch rate.

    So I do my best to leave them alone until day 18. On day 18, I candle them, remove any that aren't developing, remove the eggs from the turner and put them in cardboard egg cartons. I cut the tops off the cartons so that they are open. The cartons keep them upright and keep the newly hatched chicks from playing kickball with the unhatched eggs. I also don't do anything for humidity until day 18. Then I add water to keep the humidity above 50%. So far this has worked well for me.

    I've had a broody hen several times, and I've observed how she takes breaks and how she moves the eggs all over the place. So in nature, eggs aren't as fragile as we sometimes assume they are. However, in an artificial incubation environment (an incubator), they seem to be a little more vulnerable.

    Good luck - hope that you get a great hatch rate with your next incubation.
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Some people like to hatch their eggs in the upright position with the pointy end down. The professionals lay them on their side. I lay mine on the side. I seriously doubt you laying them on the side caused that problem.

    I take the turner out, partly so there are no sharp corners where chicks can snag a leg but mainly just to make clean-up easier.

    Some things that may cause them to get that far and stop. I’m sure there are several others.

    How good is your ventilation? Especially late in the incubation and during hatch, the chicks need fresh air to breathe. You need some air exchange to get rid of carbon dioxide and let oxygen in.

    If your humidity is too low during incubation, the chick can dry out and the membrane collapse around it. The membrane locks it up so tightly they can’t move to position themselves to hatch.

    If your humidity is too high, the eggs may not lose enough moisture so the chicks are too large and mushy to be able to position themselves. Lower incubating temperatures can contribute to this too.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    I forgot to mention an obvious possible cause. Did you incubate the eggs upside-down? That would really mess up them getting into position to ahtch.
     
  5. olesmokey88

    olesmokey88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks everyone for the replies and yes I did have the eggs upside down for the first 12 days but I had never used a turner before. I borrowed a friends and he didn't tell me any different but thanks to this forum I learned where I went wrong. And now I'm just looking at different methods so I can take something from all of them and make one of my own :) I'm going to do the dry incubation until one pips then I will up it to 60-70% where I live the humidity is always pretty high I live beside a creek lol. If I can figure out how ill post a pic of my homemade incubator.

    Thanks again for all the replies
    David
     
  6. olesmokey88

    olesmokey88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 2, 2013
    [​IMG]
     
  7. olesmokey88

    olesmokey88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 2, 2013
    [​IMG]
     
  8. olesmokey88

    olesmokey88 Out Of The Brooder

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    It's a storage tote from Wally World I have a 2x2 frame with tack cloth built on the inside separating my heat source and the eggs the thermostat is a water heater type I've drilled extra holes in it so the air can circulate better i also keep a night light directly under the thermostat so it keeps it at operating temp better. I have a fan in the bottom circulating air the temp never fluctuates it stays between 98-100 constantly. As good as its working hopefully, surely, possibly ill get some little babies :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013

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