I have an aggressive Cooper hawk hunting and killing my hens.

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by sharonlacouture, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. sharonlacouture

    sharonlacouture Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 14, 2012
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    Wednesday at dusk I lost my favorite hen (Pecky) and Thursday morning I lost my largest hen (Bertha) on Thurs I went out to check on the birds at 11 AM and as I approached the coop the hawk came flying out nearly taking my head off! And don't believe all you hear about a hawk needing a 'runway' for landings or takeoffs. It's simply not the case. This hawk was IN the coop and had less than 3 feet of width to make his escape with a vertical 6 foot fence to clear. He managed nicely.
    We covered the coop and yard with bird netting, assuming we fixed his wagon!
    This morning I went out to let my 3 remaining birds out of the coop in time to witness the hawk shredding the netting over the chicken yard. He wasn't stuck, he was determined!
    Our next step is to cover everything with chicken wire! I hope it works!
    It's that or rehoming just to save them.
    The pie tins, CD's, flags, music....none of it works.
    Save your time and money.
    And I am too old to be climbing trees to hang fishing line!
    Let's hope the chicken wire works!
    ~Sharon
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Once they locate a food source they can be brazen persistant pests. I frequently have them hanging on the aviaries of my pigeon lofts. I have even had them hit a flock of pigeons feeding at my feet and hit the aviaries while I am standing there. I am not particcularly fond of them. [​IMG] None of the purported devices for keeping them away worked for me. The only solution was hardware cloth and lockdown of my birds.
     
  3. coonhoundmama87

    coonhoundmama87 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cooper hawks are the worst! They can dive through just about anything to get to what they want. And they fear just about nothing. I'd for sure put up the new wire, that should keep them out, and keep everyone locked in. Short of the less liked solution, it's the only thing you can do.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. TW1Kell

    TW1Kell Chillin' With My Peeps

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    12 ga. shotgun with #6 shot. THAT does great out to about 50 yards. Depending on regulations, you might have to obtain a permit before you "remove" it from the equation.
     
  5. sharonlacouture

    sharonlacouture Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 14, 2012
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    It is a federal crime to kill a bird of prey ANY WHERE in the USA. Believe me, shooting it was my first instinct.
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    When it is a Coopers hawk, even female, I have very good success using a game rooster as a repellent. Hawk may latch on to a hen but rooster will pound it by flogging putting hawk in on run. For me, such roosters enable even chicks / juveniles to free-range.
     
  7. kaeKY

    kaeKY Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 5, 2012
    OMG, it was shredding the netting? Can you tell me what kind of netting you are using and how was it shredding it? I thought my netting would keep the girls safe!
     
  8. TW1Kell

    TW1Kell Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I havbe since found out (from my huntin' buddy the Game Warden) that you are correct. Getting a permit is an Urban Legend. There is no permit for removing Raptors as nuisances. OOPS! (shifty eyed look).
     

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