I have faulty chicks..

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by ourltlflock, Mar 7, 2014.

  1. ourltlflock

    ourltlflock Out Of The Brooder

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    My 5 chicks are a little over 2wks old. Yesterday I offered them some mashed up hard boiled eggs, they hated them. Then I offered some spinach leaves, nothing. My chicks seem to only like their food...[​IMG]
     
  2. Araucana16

    Araucana16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I guess all chicks have their likes and dislikes... although I suspect that they don't know what you were giving them.

    If you want for them to eat some snacks, feel free to mix a few little bits of eggs and spinach in their food. Start small as to help them get used to it. As they get older, they'll probably get a bit more adventurous. [​IMG]
     
  3. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    Nothing wrong with that. if you want to see them go nuts over something, buy some forage oats at Tractor Supply. Then sprout them and dice the 4 day old sprouts. The chicks relish them and they are so good for them. Here's the skinny on the value of sprouted oats ad why you should feed them at 4 days old. From one thru three days old, sprouted oats are fed as "grain feed" , as part of the daily ration. because of the nutrient change described below, on the 4th day and thereafter spouted oats are fed a "green feed". A supplement to the daily ration at the rate of 1 cubic inch per adult bird per day. Feed to bowel tolerance, if the stools seem a bit soft, back off and feed les and the stools will firm up again:
    ~~
    Description of nutritive values of sprouted oats at different stages of growth.
    National Barred Rock Journal, Volumes 7-21
    International Plymouth Rock Journal
    http://tinyurl.com/4b6hyeb
    GREEN FEED FOR POULTRY
    (left column, right column is Purina Poultry Chows ad w/checkerboard.
    By C. W. Ashing, Laurel. Iowa
    There are a great many poultry raisers who are now just raising a small bunch of chickens each year and keeping only a couple of dozen hens, that would dearly love to get into the poultry game on a little larger scale; that would like to raise poultry and keep enough hens each winter to make it a paying proposition. Of course it pays, even with a few, but it would be so much better if this flock was expanded until it is a real paying business. Those with only a back yard for range have always considered this impossible, thinking that it would be necessary to have an acre or two of ground for range for this purpose, but since it has been proven that poultry can be raised and kept in confinement the year 'round and made to pay, a great many people are realizing an ambition to raise poultry that they thought was beyond their reach. The big drawback with poultry in confinement has always been the lack of a reliable supply of succulent green feed, and of course this is an absolute necessity both for the laying hens and for the growing stock. Sprouted oats is by far the most convenient and best for this purpose and at the same time costs the least. Besides sprouted oats carry vitamine "E" which is claimed by government authorities to have a direct influence upon the reproductive organs of* both the male and female. Consequently it not only produces an abundance of eggs right at the time when they are worth the most, but at the same time transmits strength and vigor through the male to the germ of the egg, and the result is bigger hatches and stronger birds, because they have strength and vigor handed down to them from the parent stock. Then for your chicks and maturing pullets sprouted oats are about the finest thing in the world. If you feed the sprouted oats on the fourth day of germination you conserve the food value of the kernel. On the fourth day the starches of the kernel have been chtnged to maltose or grain sugar. This is the first stage in the process of digestion and is caused by the presence of Enzyme Diastase in large quantities. This Enzyme Diastase not only changes the starches of the oat kernel to grain sugar, but it performs the same function with other foods that it comes in contact with within the fowl's digestive system. It is the same result that is obtained from feeding yeast, but without the cost. Because of its aid to digestion, agricultural colleges and other authorities on poultry culture advise the feeding of sprouted oats the year "round even where the birds have access to free range. I believe that we can say that it is the same with poultry as with everything else, "where there is a will, there is a way" especially if that "will" is accompanied with a sincere "love for chickens." If you have this "love for chickens." and only have a small back yard you will make a far greater success of the poultry business than the man who goes into the game with a large place, but without the liking for taking car' of his birds, and looking first at the dollar he is to gain.
    ------------------------
    Here is an illustrated tutorial on sprouting seeds. Oats are the best seeds to sprout. Lisa202 wrote post #285 of 640 on 2/4/11 https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/425134/anybody-raise-sprouts-to-feed-the-chickens/280
    The lid is a single layer of lain burlap held on the jar by the screw-on lid.
    ---------------
    "One of the parts of the mixed feed was called "grain". Instead of using plain seeds from oats or wheat, etc., they could substitute 1,2,or 3 day old sprouted seed as that part of the "grain feed" part of the mixture.
    Green feed ~~ For this, they used sprouted grains which were 4 days old and older." Green feed was used to condition the fowl ; bring the hens into lay ; and add vigor to the male thru his diet( he would them pass this increased vigor on to his chicks thru robust sperm).
    ===============

    The question as asked is it ok to feed the sprouts if the sprout is longer than the original seed? Answer:
    ~~a) are they still ok to eat longer than the seed/bean? ------------ Believe it or not, I actually have an answer for this. smile Took a lot of looking and most of the quoted info was sent to the list earlier in this thread. The synopsis is , Sprouted seeds can be fed as a green food or a grain food. The difference occurs at the 4th day of sprouting. Before the 4th day, the seeds carry the protein of the unsprouted seed. They are fed as grain feed. On the 4th day, the proteins in the seed meet an enzyme(forget the name) and they are turned to starches. Anytime after the 4th day, sprouted grains are fed as green feed. As I understand it from the classic books, in the old days when farmers would make their own mixed feed, they would have several parts to the ration. A percentage of this and a percentage of that. One of the parts of the mixed feed was called "grain". Instead of using plain seeds from oats or wheat, etc., they could substitute 1,2,or 3 day old sprouted seed as that part of the "grain" part of the mixture. Green feed was used to condition the fowl ; bring the hens into lay ; and add vigor to the male thru his diet( he would them pass this increased vigor on to his chicks thru robust sperm). For this, they used sprouted grains which were 4 days old and older. So it's not about the length of the sprout, it's about the age. Some books say one can feed them 4-6 inches long. Other books warn 1 1/2 inches is the max. Still other books say one should feed them at 1/4 to 1/2 inch long. The underlying premise here is that : 1. 1/4 to 1/2 is probably under 4 days, thus grain feed. 2. 1-1/2 inches long could be either grain feed or over the 4 days limit and used as green feed. 3. 4-6 inches is obviously green feed. Several books did warn that if one was going to grow the sprouts past 1 inch long to be wary of mold or slimy sprouts. Interesting, huh?
    -----------------------


    Best Regards, Karen Tewart
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
  4. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    If you don't want t take time to sprout oats, you can steam them instead. It only takes overnight !!

    ~~I was digging around on the Net looking for more stuff on sprouting seeds for chickens.
    I came across a 1919 USDA Extension newsletter. It was an article on "steamed oats". Takes only overnight and a great supplement for the birds. Basically you take your forage oats and put in a pan of water and let them soak overnight just like for sprouting oats. The next morning, take the pan with the same oats and water in it and put on the stove to simmer uncovered for one hour. Make sure you put at least twice as much water as oats because they soak up at least the same amount of water as their volume, just like rice does. The simmering will kill any mold or bacteria in the oats. After that, rinse with warm water (like macaroni) and serve warm to the birds. Excellent mixed with table scraps if you want, the article said. Ok, so I thought this looks real easy. I am all for the "easy" part of it. Made it up and fed it to the birds this morning. They went bug ugly nuts for it! [​IMG] Two of the pullets got off their nest where they were laying eggs to go dine. The article says feeding this a a supplement will maintain a regular egg yield. The end result is the the oats about double in yield like regular rice does. I put in 2 cups of oats and ended up with 4 cups of steamed oats. More then enough for my 9 chickens. Oh, the boys were so excited to have a special treat to show their girls, it was really cute.
    Best,
    Karen
    Which forage oat to choose? I use non-GMO Plotspike from Tractor Supply and here's why: http://plotspike.com/forageoats.htm
    excerpt: "PlotSpike sources, packs, and contract produces all our own seed. We know the origin of our seeds and the genetic capabilities of our varieties. We have several varieties, like our Forage Oats, that are only available from PlotSpike and were developed just for our customers. We sell pure, proven, and premium seeds with no fillers or unnecessary coatings. Because of that all our seeds for food plots are guaranteed! If for any reason you fail to get a stand we will replace your seed. Call us toll free at (800) 264-5281, and we will send the replacement seed directly to you--no need to return to your retailer. What's Hot Tips & Tricks

    PlotSpike Forage Oats PlotSpike Forage Oats make a fantastic early season, annual plot. These oats were bred specifically for forage and yield a tremendous amount of high quality forage in the Fall of the year. None of our mixes will grow in total shade, however, we recommend you try our Shade Blend mix if you think there might be enough sunlight getting to the plot. Shade Blend is easy to establish and should work if the plot gets as little as 4 hours of sunlight per day."
    http://plotspike.com/Press/purepr.pdf 8-15-2002 http://plotspike.com/Press/ForagePress.pdf 2-6-2003 http://plotspike.com/Press/foragelease.pdf 6-3-2003
    Ask the developer of the seed. I have found these scientists and researcher wonderfully forthcoming with information when I ask about their area of interest. steve harrison LSU Ag Center developed Plotspike Forage Oats . http://www.lsuagcenter.com/en/communications/authors/SHarrison.htm
    http://deltafarmpress.com/new-lsu-agcenter-oat-variety-goes-market
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
  5. ourltlflock

    ourltlflock Out Of The Brooder

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    Great info 3riverschick! Definitely a lot of useful info to comb through. [​IMG]
     
  6. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    You don't have 100 chicks so the mason jar method I used for my 12 should be just fine for you.
    Just like in the illustrated tutorial but feed on the 4th day instead of the 3rd. It's just fine to feed
    on the 5th thru 7th day too, just 4th day is best. After the 7th day, you run the risk of the sprouts
    going bad You can tel they are bad if they smell "off" or feel slimy. If so, throw them out.
    Best,
    Karen
     
  7. WYNot

    WYNot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wouldn't sweat it too much. Our five chicks last year would turn up their beaks at everything but their own crumbles. Then they got moved from the brooder to the small coop/run. After being outdoors for a few weeks and in real grass and bugs for a while they decided that fruits and veggies and grass and bugs were delish. Now they come running when they see us because more than likely we have some greens or veggies or tomatoes or on rare occasions grapes (aka chicken crack). Just like real kids, their taste buds need time to develop an appreciation for the finer foods in life. ;)

     
  8. Teppler

    Teppler Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 29, 2014
    Denison, Texas
    I think I must have faulty chickens also, I have two grown RIR hens and 8 new pullets about 3 months old. I read here about hanging a head of cabbage and chickens would really enjoying playing and eating Weellllllll none would have anything to do with it I even took it down and pulled it apart for them and it layed there till it started ruining finally threw it away. They do love dried meal worms though..
     
  9. MandiB

    MandiB Out Of The Brooder

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    I have 3 week olds. They don't care for much except the mealworms. But they do enjoy blueberries and torn up raspberries. But mostly they play chase and keep away with them. I keep feeding these treats because it amuses me! I must have a really good quality chick feed for them to mostly just want that.
     
  10. ourltlflock

    ourltlflock Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 2, 2014
    Las Vegas
    I have now tried yogurt and fresh weeds/grass......nothing....[​IMG]
     

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