I HAVE ORPHANS!!!! :( UPDATE, got em !!

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by suenrob, May 14, 2008.

  1. suenrob

    suenrob Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 22, 2008
    Ft. Myers, FL
    Mama hen (Layla) was killed by a Hawk!!! She was defending her babies. He got one of them, now there are 5. I can't catch them, she had trained them well to run from me. I am going to try to get them tonight with a net when they go to their nesting spot.

    Here she is after the hatch, she was a good mama and will be sadly missed [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2008
  2. ChicknThief

    ChicknThief Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 12, 2008
    Nor Cal
    :aww That's horrible. I am so sorry for your loss.
     
  3. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    [​IMG] So sorry! She was a great mama to risk so much to protect her babies! Sending "catching" vibes your way that you will be able to round up the other chicks tonight!
     
  4. suenrob

    suenrob Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 22, 2008
    Ft. Myers, FL
    Thanks guys! I have 62 eggs hatching in 2 bators today to keep my mind off of her. Got my very first silkie chick a couple hours ago!!! What a bitter sweet day
     
  5. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Bi0sC0mp

    Bi0sC0mp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2008
    Raiford,FLA
    this is the reason i dont free range my chickens way to much of a risk..so sorry for your lose..she sounds and looks llike she was a great mama hen she will be missed for sure..
     
  7. ruth

    ruth Life is a Journey

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    Jul 8, 2007
    Woodville, MS
    So sorry to hear of your loss. She died a hero's death. While there are losses with free ranging I find the advantages far outweigh them. The chickens have more joy and freedom and you get to enjoy them more. There are losses even if raising them in Fort Knox so please don't let others say "I told you so".

    As far as catching the babies - I don't even try with mine - they are all semi-wild and free range. But what works wonders is herding them. It works with any age group and with the ducklings. I have a long L-Shaped thin copper pipe that I found that I use but a stick with a branch on end would work. Just walk very slowly behind them and use the stick like a shepherds hook. Keep them together and moving slowly forward - use the hook if one starts to wander or they start to break formation. It only takes moving it to whichever side of them to keep them moving. I never have to actually touch one with it. I find I can herd them anywhere. I get them from the outside yard into the run and into individual cages/hutchs this way. Works like a charm. Good thing cause no way, no how I could catch those little buggers they run like football players.

    It is important to move kind of slowly and just keep up with them. If not they kind of panic and scatter.
     
  8. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    I am so sorry, Sue. I wish you luck catching them. From the photos they look small enough to still need a brooder. What are your night time temps there?
     
  9. keeperofthehearth

    keeperofthehearth Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ruth writes:

    As far as catching the babies - I don't even try with mine - they are all semi-wild and free range. But what works wonders is herding them. It works with any age group and with the ducklings. I have a long L-Shaped thin copper pipe that I found that I use but a stick with a branch on end would work. Just walk very slowly behind them and use the stick like a shepherds hook. Keep them together and moving slowly forward - use the hook if one starts to wander or they start to break formation. It only takes moving it to whichever side of them to keep them moving. I never have to actually touch one with it. I find I can herd them anywhere. I get them from the outside yard into the run and into individual cages/hutchs this way. Works like a charm. Good thing cause no way, no how I could catch those little buggers they run like football players. It is important to move kind of slowly and just keep up with them. If not they kind of panic and scatter.

    I agree. A bright wide leaf rake works well also.
    So sorry for your loss. What a wonderful protector your broody was. [​IMG] Hopefully you can get those babies in to a safe place.​
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2008
  10. redneck

    redneck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2007
    Lynchburg,Tn.
    I have used bread balls the size bb's or a little bit bigger. Just pinvh a little bread off and role it into a ball and throw there way. Once the realize what it is and they can eat it the will go in the direction that you through it. I just keep throwing as I walk towards the pen and pretty soon the chickens don't realize that they are in the pen until it to late. They get distracted by the food.
     

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