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I have some questions about Marek's disease and Laryngotracheitis and their vaccines.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cochins1088, Oct 4, 2013.

  1. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm getting a show quality pair of bantam chickens from a very well known breeder, however, he told me that he had a problem with mareks disease in his LF flocks in the past, so now he vaccinates all of his birds. If I understand correctly, the vaccine won't make them carriers, but it could hide the disease. So if the birds are infected, they will show no symptoms but remains carriers for life.

    I've raised chickens for 6 years and I've never had any problems with disease. My flock is very healthy and I've never vaccinated them before.


    So, what risk am I taking? Should I buy the vaccine and vaccinate all of my current birds (young and old) before getting this pair? Is my understanding of how the vaccine works correct?

    Any help would be much appreciated.






    Edited to add: Questions about Laryngotracheitis start in post #6.

    Original question:

    The breeder also vaccinates for Laryngo as a preventative. Is there anything that I should be aware of with that vaccine? I tried researching it, but I just ended up with a lot of conflicting information.

    Additional question after research:

    If the breeder used the chicken embryo origin (CEO) version of the vaccine, will the birds remain carriers possibly spreading the disease to my flock? How about the tissue culture origin (TCO) version?
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2013
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Birds that have been vaccinated can carry the disease without showing symptoms. Basically, if you don't have any unvaccinated birds, you might never even know that your flock has the disease. Mareks is everywhere, but you don't see it all the time because many birds are vaccinated.

    It is probably too late to vaccinate your other birds. Marek's is in the ground and in the enviroment. Your birds have probably been exposed to it already. Thats why hatcheries vaccinate chicks at one day old, because the vaccine won't work if the birds have already been exposed.

    Many chickens are resistant to the disease. Only non-resistant birds, or those under stress, tend to get the disease. If you birds haven't shown Marek's yet, they might be resistant to it. Keep the stress-free as possible, and they have a higher chance of not getting the disease.
     
  3. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So even if the birds that I want to buy are carriers of Marek's disease, it most likely won't affect my flock, correct?

    It just makes me nervous... I've never had any unexplained deaths so I had always assumed that I didn't have Marek's in my current flock. Would it hurt anything to vaccinate the older birds anyways?
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2013
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    If your birds are unvaccinated, they might be affected. Or, they might not be. Marek's is a difficult disease that comes in so many different forms and can affect chickens in so many different ways. If your birds aren't too stressed out, they have a greater chance of not getting the disease. Some of you birds may get it, some might not, or none of them might get it.

    It would not hurt to vaccinate the older birds. However, it might not help much, either.
     
  5. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Oz. I might as well vaccinate my flock for Marek's. It's better to be safe than sorry. Where do you buy your vaccines?

    The breeder also vaccinates for Laryngo as a preventative. Is there anything that I should be aware of with that vaccine? I tried researching it, but I just ended up with a lot of conflicting information.

    One site said that it's a live virus vaccine that causes the vaccinated birds to become carriers. A different site said that the vaccine could prevent infected birds from becoming carriers. Both seemed like reliable sites.
     
  6. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I've heard that birds vaccinated for Laryngotracheitis are carriers, but like you, I'm not sure.
     
  7. ozexpat

    ozexpat CocoBeach Farm

    Get the MD vaccine from Jefferspet.com

    Some info on

    Laryngotracheitis

    Laryngotracheitis (LT) affects both chickens and pheasants. Vaccination against LT is not as successful as for other diseases, but is an excellent preventive measure for use in outbreaks and in epidemic areas. State approval is required prior to vaccination. Do not vaccinate unless you have a problem on your farm or in your area. If an owner chooses to vaccinate, all chickens on the premises must be vaccinated, including any new birds that are added later. Yearly boosters are advised.
    The vaccine is administered by the eye- or nose-drop method. Birds should be at least 4 weeks old. Younger birds are less responsive to vaccines.
    Rapid diagnosis and vaccination can also stop an outbreak from spreading in an infected flock.


    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps030

    I would call the state and get their advice. You cannot just buy LT vaccine either so I would make sure the seller is not confusing it with something else like infectious bronchitis or NCD.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2013
  8. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found this site and I believe that it's credible, what's your opinion Oz? http://agr.wa.gov/FoodAnimal/AvianHealth/Docs/iltfactsheet.pdf

    Here's what it says:

    Vaccination

    Three types of ILT vaccines are used:

    1. Tissue culture origin (TCO) vaccines have a relatively low level of infectiousness and are administered by an eye drop. A disadvantage of TCO vaccines is that the level of immunity is limited; the advantage of this is that it causes a less severe reaction and the birds do not shed the virus.

    2. Recombinant ILT vaccines have been developed. These recombinant ILT vaccines can be administered as a single dose, by subcutaneous injection, on day 1 or in older bird. It is reported to provide ILT immunity for up to 60 weeks. The recombinant vaccine does not cause shedding of the virus; therefore unvaccinated birds are not placed at risk. It has also limited level of immunity and birds may develop mild clinical signs of ILT. These vaccines are also more expensive.

    3. Chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines can be administered through an eye drop or mass vaccination, such as spray or water. While these CEO vaccines result in a better immunity, it can cause severe clinical signs and disease due to the increased level of infectiousness. Also, chickens treated with CEO vaccine can become carriers of the virus, putting unvaccinated flocks at risk. In Washington, chick embryo origin vaccine is only for sale at the discretion of the State Veterinarian.



    From this I gather that if the breeder used either a TCO or Recombinant ILT vaccine, than the birds won't be carriers. How ever, if the breeder used a CEO vaccine, than they will be carriers. I'll ask him which he used. If the CEO vaccine was used, than I won't buy the birds.
     
  9. cochins1088

    cochins1088 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    These aren't as credible, but both Murray McMurray Hatchery and Twin City Poultry Supply sell the vaccine and this is what they say in their descriptions.

    This is from Murray McMurray Hatchery:

    Laryngotracheitis is an acute and highly contagious disease with gasping and spitting of blood. The lining of the windpipe swells up and sometimes the bird chokes to death. Sometimes this disease is contracted at poultry shows. Many fanciers who show their birds are sure to vaccinate for Laryngo. Vaccinate healthy birds 4 weeks of age or older, with an eyedropper. 1,000 dose bottle.


    This is from Twin City Poultry Supply:

    Has been shown to not spread from bird to bird in challenge-based contact controlled studies. Solid and uniform protection against infectious laryngotracheitis when administered via eye-drop or nostril. Safe — more attenuated than CEO vaccines, has not been associated with vaccine-induced outbreaks.
     

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