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I HAVE SYMPTOMS!!!! (icky pics...)...UPDATE...post #35

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by crystalchik, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. crystalchik

    crystalchik Songster

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    FINALLY!!! I have something to work with! I was on a while ago trying to figure out why my chicks were dying and my adults were sick. My chicks would get putrid smelling pasty butts, then get lethargic and die within a 24 hours and the chicks were usually under a week old. My adults have had upper respiratory problems with crusty eyes, and congestion. I have also noticed that they stink, and so did the one I just picked up that was dying.
    Today, last night, 2 more chicks died and I have 3 that are lethargic, so i am fearing for them. I found a "teenager" dying, and upon inspection when I picked him up, in additon to the crusty eyes which I already knew about, I found him "swallowing", kind of like he had something in his beak he was trying to swallow. I opened his beak to find a bunch of cheesy off-white patches all over the inside of his beak and throat, but nothing was blocking off his trachea. I also noticed that he had the same clogged butt as the younger chicks did. (I dont want it to sound like I dont take care of my birds and i never look at them, so I want to add that i picked him up last night for an oxine treatment and he seemed okay)

    Anyways, the chicks that are sick are coming out of the same coop that this teen just died in. Does anyone have a clue as to what it is? I have been treating them with Oxine, have tried Sulmet and Albon and antibiotics for adults with no improvement except for the Oxine, which seemed like it was cutting down on the severity of the congestion. For the chicks I have tried Albon and Sulmet, been treating them with oxine, and have had them on antibiotics for about 5 days with no improvement.

    On the other hand, I know this is not pox, which look similiar in the throat. I have had pox outbreaks before, and it just isnt the same. None of my chickens have growths, and the rest dont have anything in the throat, but they may just be in an early stage?

    Here is a pic of the throat, the crusty eyes, and the butts on the teen and chicks:

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    Last edited: Jul 27, 2010

  2. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    That looks bad... but maybe not as bad as it looks. Could it be Coryza? Do they have a bad smell around their faces?
     
  3. honeydoll

    honeydoll Songster

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    Oh poor things. Hope you can find out what this is fast. It sounds pretty bad but hopefully it will be easy to treat. There is a link to a list of poultry diseases. I will look for it. It lists the diseases and the symptoms and treatment. It has been put on some posts here, maybe you could do a search for it. Hope you can get help. Sorry for your troubles.
     
  4. crystalchik

    crystalchik Songster

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    Yes they do. I will do research on that, do you have any experience with that?
     
  5. crystalchik

    crystalchik Songster

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    Just research Coryza, and a lot of the symptoms fit. My only question/concern is that if it is bacterial, shouldnt the antibiotics have taken care of it?

    Thank you for your support Honeydoll [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2010
  6. pamperedpoultry

    pamperedpoultry CHICKENFIED

    The smell is a dead give away of coryza Here is a link on it http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/82/infectious-coryza I had experience with it once when I very first got into chickens. I doctored a hen for over a month with no improvement and I finally decided to cull. If it was me I'd cull and start over after a vigorous cleaning. Coryza is a carrier disease so once the ones that do live get over it they will be carriers and any new birds brought in will get it and any kind of stress can make it show its ugly face again. You do what you think you need to do. If these are your pets and you dont plan on selling or bringing in any new birds til these have died of old age then I'd try my best to get them better. But if you plan to bring any new ones in or raise and sell then I would cull, cause once you sell them you'll be handing off this disease to someone else. I hate your having to go through this! [​IMG]
     
  7. pamperedpoultry

    pamperedpoultry CHICKENFIED

    Quote:The Op said they did stink , I also agree on culling
     

  8. crystalchik

    crystalchik Songster

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    Well, i am trying to keep myself from going into a complete depression at this point. [​IMG] I think I will see if I can scrape together some money to get them cultured before I make any decisions, which wont be easy seeing that I am 17 and these birds that are sick are my source of income and I have not sold any in months. But i think that it may be the most helpful procedure in diagnosing what is going on. I also saved the carcasses of the dead chicks and "teens" in the case I should need them for inspection.

    Does anyone know how Coryza is transmitted? I have not brought any new birds home in close to a year and it has been a year and a half unfortunately since I have been to a show.
     
  9. pamperedpoultry

    pamperedpoultry CHICKENFIED

    Here is another link with some info on it http://fowlfacts.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=afflictiondiseaseff&action=print&thread=1217

    Direct
    contact, aerosolization, and ingestion (drinking water). Reservoir = chronically ill or healthy carrier birds.
    Coryza is primarily transmitted by direct bird-to-bird contact. This can be from infected birds brought into the flock as well as from birds which recover from the disease which remain carriers of the organism and may shed intermittently throughout their lives.
    Birds risk exposure at poultry shows, bird swaps, and live-bird sales.
    Inapparent infected adult birds added into a flock are a common source for outbreaks.
    Within a flock, inhalation of airborne respiratory droplets, and contamination of feed and/or water are common modes of spread

    The main sign of it is the Smelly sinus drainage and is the only disease that has that. I know you mentioned they stink but is it coming from their mouth and nose??
     
  10. honeydoll

    honeydoll Songster

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    I think getting a culture done is wise, but if it would take too long to be able to get one I would cull mine. I know it's hard to do, but starting over may be in your best interest if you want to show and breed again. You are not in a very easy position. I hope you can get a culture done to be 100% positive what it is. But if you can't and you do want to put these birds in the public arena again you may have a tough choice. Kudos for being so responsible and looking for help. [​IMG] Either way, this will be a learning experience for you, and probably already has.
     

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