I just found out RIR's rarely go broody....

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by holliewould, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. holliewould

    holliewould Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Why is that? Is it because they have to lay a clutch of 100 eggs or something to get them to sit? Why wouldn't they want to sit after a half dozen eggs or so? Can you force em to sit? What if I had a flock of 12 hens and one roo and no electricity...how would my flock continue without an incubator? Set the eggs in an aluminum egg carton in the sunlight all dang day? Has anyone had a RIR go broody? learning this kind of ruined my plans for my RIR's to rule the galaxy and all. Boooooo.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2008
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Quote:The breed plus hormones determine if a hen goes broody. RIRs are not the broody type, although on occasion, one will go broody. Dont hold your breath, though. Cant force them to sit, either. And you would need an incubator or another breed known for broodiness to fill that need, and put your RIR eggs under her when she does set.
     
  3. holliewould

    holliewould Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can you tell me how old the RIR breed is? I heard the early 1800's but I'm not sure. Isn't it a heritage breed? I'm researching this and it seems to be one of the most popular breeds of dual purpose chickens so I'm kind of curious how the oldtimers sustained a flock of RIR's without broodiness. I hope I made sense Iol
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Decades ago, they were more broody than they are now. Over time, hatcheries culled for broodiness in favor of production, generally, so for many breeds who used to go broody, that has pretty much changed. You may find some broodiness still there in breeder birds as opposed to hatchery birds.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2008
  5. holliewould

    holliewould Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well that's good to know. Thanks so much for the input. [​IMG]
     
  6. keljonma

    keljonma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 12, 2007
    8A East Texas
    The RIR Club of America was founded in 1898. RIRs were admitted into the APA Standard in 1904.
    http://www.crohio.com/reds/

    According to LocalHarvest.org
    The rich, reddish-black plumage and red comb of the "Old-Type" Rhode Island Red chicken is an iconic symbol of American agriculture. It is a successful dual-purpose bird, and an excellent-tempered farm chicken, with a highly productive brown egg-laying rate. Since the 1940's, the Rhode Island Red has been selectively bred for more efficient egg production, becoming smaller, lighter colored, and less broody as a result. Of greatest conservation interest are the "Old-Type" Rhode Island Reds, which are larger, darker, and more broody. The "Old-Type" Rhode Island Red chicken has an incredibly rich flavor that is most appropriate for (and best released in) stews.

    According to American Livestock Breed Conservancy, the RIR is on the Recovering list. Here is where that information is on the web:
    http://www.albc-usa.org/cpl/wtchlist.html#chickens
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2008
  7. holliewould

    holliewould Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thanks so much for the info. I'm all over the links as I type. thanks again keljonma [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2008
  8. rSpriggs

    rSpriggs Out Of The Brooder

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    In the past couple years, I had 1 RIR make a lobotomized attempt to set.
    My Buff Orps tend to be only a little more broody, but successful . . .

    Since RIR roos can be more agressive (and I choose not to get into any more drop-kicking counseling sessions), I've been considering getting a Buff roo and RIR hens, and incubating eggs as needed.

    Has anyone worked with that combination before?

    Also, from the relatively little experience I've had, it appears to me that aggressive roosters appear to be more, ah, [​IMG] screwy [​IMG] .
    Since I do want fertile eggs, I'd like to know if that in fact is true?

    Thanks for any help!

    Russ
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2008
  9. ginasmarans

    ginasmarans Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    West Tn
    That's what they say,but don't be surprized if they do set. I've had 3 white leghorn hens go broody this year. I had 2 go broody lat year.
     

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