I know I should have quarantined, but.....

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by RM44, Nov 13, 2009.

  1. RM44

    RM44 Songster

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    Jul 15, 2009
    Woodstock, Georgia
    I picked up 2 new chickens that were supposedly 8 months old from a private residence about a week ago. I inspected the operation (the guy had about 200 chickens in various cages, some free ranging, etc.) He was raising them for eggs, breeding, trading, etc. All of the chickens appeared to be very healthy; I didn't see any signs of problems. I know I should have QTed anyway, but it's too late now, and I need help, so comments that I should have QTed are not helpful at this point.

    One of the new chickens had a closed eye, which I thought was just pecked (this chicken was pretty thin and seemed to be way down on the pecking order). The man pulled the eyelid open and you could see that the chicken still had an eye, it was just closed for some reason. There was no sign of discharge coming from the eye. Over the week the eye didn't get any worse, but I did notice that the other eye had some goop around the lid. I just thought maybe the eyelid was thick, but in retrospect, I think it was discharge/mucous.

    This same chicken seems to be less entusiastic about eating, and is very skinny, but does eat, and does get out of the coop. All of the other chickens pick on her though, so she spends most of her time in isolation.

    After a few days I also noticed what I thought was an odor coming from her. She smells sort of like dried chicken poop. I did some research, and I think it's possible she has Infectious Coryza (sp?). Anyway, I don't have a separate pen for QTing, and haven't separated her from the flock. I've read it's too late now anyway. I also haven't treated with anything at this point.

    I have also noticed a few black spots on her comb (very small, she had them when I got her, but I just thought they were birthmarks or natural coloring.) Research now suggests that any black spots on the comb/wattle are not normal. Is that true?

    This morning my incredibly beautiful and healthy 6 month old Black Australorp has a very rattley chest and/or nasal passage. I can hear her breathing and is sounds like a kid with the croop (chest/nose rattling wet sounds with every breath). Also, the BA is not interested in eating or getting out of the coop, but she is up and moving around.

    To complicate matters, the first of my flock just started laying this week (a 7 month old RIR), so I don't want to use any antibiotics if I can get away with it.

    My questions:

    - What should I do (if anything) to treat the flock?
    - Should I try to build something to isolate these birds at this point? (I really don't have the funds or the time; I'd rather treat the flock if I have to do anything.)
    - Is it possible that the BA has something entirely different and is just a coincidence?
    - Is it possibly phneumonia (the BA)?

    Any suggestions/comments/advice is welcome.

    For background, my flock consists of:

    2 seven month old RIRs (aquired 7/5/09)
    2 six month olds (one RIR and one BA) (aquired 7/5/09)
    2 supposed 8 month olds (one RIR and one Dominique) (aquired 11/5/09)
     
  2. Msbear

    Msbear Fancy Banties

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    I would seperate right away.. any birds that have symptoms. It is NOT too late. Put them in dog/cat crates, a big cardboard box with screen or something over it.. anything. Then clean all waterers and feeders.

    Maybe someone else will get on here with help about treatment but, I would do anything possible to lessen the risk to the rest of the flock
     
  3. CheerfulHeart2

    CheerfulHeart2 Creative Problem Solver

    Apr 8, 2009
    Phoenix, AZ
    I hope you can get some good advice. How very diheartening.
     
  4. Sunflower01

    Sunflower01 In the Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2009
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    No finger pointing here. Been there done that. Went to the Auction and picked up some wyondotte hens and one of them ended up sick a couple of days later. Goopy closed eye, then coughing, snotty beak and then rattling in chest. Of course it went through most of my flock of 20 birds. Had to cull the worst, about 4 red sex-links. They seemed to get it the worst. Also lost, died, a blue Ameraucan and a Polish hen. Seemed the most skiddish and weakest birds did not make it. I started treating with antibiotic right after I noticed the auction hen with goopy eye and put in their drinking water terrimycin??. I was using a pinch per gallon per the feed store guy. I do not think that was enough after about 3 weeks I increased the amount of antibiotic to 2 tablespoons per gallon for another 2 weeks and everyone recovered. At about 2.5 weeks we called the local Dept. of Environment and they sent out Melissa to test our flock. She was very informative and called us the next day with the results.. It was not a viral disease and treating with antibiotics was the correct thing to do. What our flock had was bacterial and would have to take its course. I of course cleaned and bleached coup and run a couple of times and cleaned out litter , feed and water bowls faithfuly. All told it was about 5 weeks of exaustion. During the entire illness episode we would isolate the sick birds in the garage. At one point I had 6 birds in sepearte cages in the garage. But everyone has recovered and a few of our birds did not get sick at all. But lesson learned, always Isolate new birds at least one month. I think I have decided to breed within my flock. Hope this helps and you don't loose any birds.
     
  5. RM44

    RM44 Songster

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    Woodstock, Georgia
    Thanks to those who have replied so far. I am in the process of rounding up some dog kennels to isolate. Can I keep them inside the run, or do I have to move them to where the chickens can't "touch beaks", or even further away? I've never researched isolating or QTing them, so what is a good "distance"?
     
  6. hcammack

    hcammack Crowing

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    Quote:I would defently keep them far away from the other birds.
     
  7. KMHunter

    KMHunter [IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG] Cr

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    My Coop
    Keep them as far away as possible from the ones that are not sick. Out of the run and coop. Garage or somewhere like that? Mine get put in the garage or utility/laundry room. Good Luck!
     
  8. Sunflower01

    Sunflower01 In the Brooder

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    Definately keep them away from the hens that are not sick. Put the sick hens in crates a good distance away from the healthy girls. Put them in a garage, shed or even a basement if available. Or stack and tarp the crates of the sick hens outside but AWAY from the healthy girls. And dont forget to clean and disenfect the coop the healthy girls are in now. I always tended the healthy chickens before tending to the sick ones. Wash hands, clothes, change shoes before going into the healthy coop. Bio security is the name of the game. I used a spray bottle with bleach water for cleaning waterers, feeders and my hands.
     
  9. RM44

    RM44 Songster

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    Jul 15, 2009
    Woodstock, Georgia
    You guys are great! Thanks for the encouragement. The garage will actually be quite safe as it it predator-proof, so that's a great idea. I appreciate all your feedback.

    Anyone know anything about Coryza? I've read different opinions. Some say cull, some say the infected birds will always be carriers, and some places say once they're over it there's no long term harm. Anyone have any success stories?
     
  10. Msbear

    Msbear Fancy Banties

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    You don't know if that's what it is. The only way to know for sure is to have a bird tested. I would call the previous owner and let him know what happened and see if he's had an outbreak and what he would suggest. (Hopefully, he will be sorry and return your money)

    It's up to you about treatment.

    If you are breeding for health and vigor and are planning on selling birds in the future or are near a neighbor with chickens, the responsible thing would be to cull.

    If you just have a few backyard birds that you keep as pets and for eating eggs, than feel free to treat however you wish without feeling like you are doing anything wrong.
     

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