i need advice on dubbing and cropping chickenzzzzzzzz

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ChickenyChickeny, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. ChickenyChickeny

    ChickenyChickeny Songster

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    So, I might cut off one of my hen's combs and wattles cause she keeps getting frostbite in the winter, and i feel like its wrong to let her suffer through another winter of frostbite. So, how should i dub and crop them? what should I use? ....should i just take them to the vet to get it done (i would prefer not to because vets are expensive and the $$$ all belongs to my parents [i'm a kid])
     
  2. ChickenyChickeny

    ChickenyChickeny Songster

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    . . .
     
  3. Orpingtons43

    Orpingtons43 Songster

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    I don’t know how to dub... I’m just replying so HOPEFULLY there will be more views. ;)
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Ask someone in your area that shows Old English Game Bantams. It is not a process your want to put a chicken through unless you have had someone train you.
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    More information: Where do you live (generally)? Tell us about your set up. Exact dimensions of the coop (L x W x H) how many s.f. of ventilation in the coop, and how many birds. I sometimes have weeks at a time when the mercury does not even climb up to 0*F during the "heat of the day". While I may have a bit of frost bite on comb tips, it is never significant. Providing enough coop space and adequate ventilation is key to ensuring good air quality to prevent winter frost bite.

    I would rather address the housing issue than dub combs and wattles.
     
  6. ChickenyChickeny

    ChickenyChickeny Songster

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    I live in central alberta, my coop dimensions are roughly 4 feet by 4 feet by 4 feet. The hens only sleep in there though, they are outside in the day even in the winter! they are tough. i have three ventilation holes in the coop, each are each 7 inches by 1.5 inches. i am in the process of persuading my parents to build a new coop, though
     
  7. ButtonquailGirl14

    ButtonquailGirl14 Crossing the Road

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    dubbing is a VERY painful thing to do to them... how about you heat their coop?
     
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    How many chickens? In order to prevent frost bite, you should have at least 4 s.f. of open floor space in the coop per bird. And you should have an area = to 10% of the footprint of the coop, or 1 s.f. of ventilation per bird. (You only have 30 sq. inches of ventilation in your whole coop. 1 s.f. of ventilation = 144 sq. inches) I also recommend a walk in style coop to allow enough cu.ft. of space for good air flow without putting the birds in a draft. Good windows on the S and E sides of the coop will be a huge benefit for helping the coop to warm up during the day time.

    A quick google search indicates that your wintertime temps are similar to mine, if not a bit warmer. It sounds like you need to address your bird's housing needs instead of cutting off their combs and wattles.
     
  9. Arya28

    Arya28 Songster

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    Yes I agree with the above posts. More info about where you live and your coop setup would be helpful. Also, on what chicken breeds you have that are experiencing the problem.

    It is not something that you want to do if you have another option, because hens have combs for a reason. They help them cool down in the summer and regulate their blood circulation.

    We live in North Central PA, where our winters are very cold and our summers are very hot. This last winter was our first winter having grown chickens and it was tough. The roosters got frostbite on their combs pretty badly. We were debating dubbing them, but after starting a thread on here, ultimately decided to let the winter take its course and see how they would be in the spring.

    All of them are ok. Some of them lost the very tips of their combs, because the winter "naturally dubbed" them. They looked horrible in the winter, their combs were all black and blue, and bloody. It was a horrific sight. However, we believe they will be stronger because of it this winter. And now, because it is mid summer, we are glad we did not dub them! Their combs help them to regulate their body temp so that they don't get too hot.

    Our hens on the other hand, never had that bad of a frostbite problem so far. None of them lost any of their combs, and you could never even tell they had a problem at all.

    So throughout the winter, we spent every single night rubbing olive and/or coconut oil on their combs. This helps protect them from the harsh conditions.

    With frostbite, it's not actually cold you need to worry about. It's moisture.

    So the oil actually blocks the moisture from their combs, hence protecting them a little more.

    Some of our roosters got frostbite still, but this saved us from a lot of problems. I would definitely recommend looking into rubbing oil on their combs.

    I would not recommend dubbing unless it is something you are absolutely certain is the best thing to do for them, especially if they are hens (hens have smaller combs).

    EDITED TO ADD: I see you added where you live in one of the above posts.
     
    ButtonquailGirl14 likes this.
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    I personally won't touch a frost bit comb. IMO, touching that damaged tissue can damage it further.

    Roos are more prone to frost bite b/c they tend to stay on high alert, even at night, while the hens are more sensible: they tuck their head under their wings. If the roo tucks his head, he still may have some of his large comb sticking out.

    Also, choosing breeds that have small combs is helpful for snow country. Pea, walnut and rose combs are great cold weather combs.
     

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