I need advise

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Marc S, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Marc S

    Marc S Just Hatched

    23
    6
    16
    Jun 27, 2016
    Southern California
    So I have 3 chicks,supposed to have 4 but 1 didn't make it so I'm getting another. I have a Lavender,A Silver Laced Orpington and a Chocolate Orpington. The Silver Laced and Chocolate are amazingly sweet! The Lavender is not! She is a total hell raiser, she freaks out when we talk to her or put even put our hands in the booder box. She flips out of we try to pick her up and cant stand the site of us. The Silver and Chocolate will fall asleep on us and super sweet. Lately the Lavender will disrupt the others if we even put our hands in there to pick one up... she was sweet-ish at first, but now she treats us like we are the devil. Any advise on how to deal with this? She even runs from treats! Lavender is about 3 weeks, Silver is 3 weeks, chocolate is about 2 weeks...
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

    15,971
    3,571
    436
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    Some chicks seem to get more wary as they grow up, and they all have different personalities. Most will become more friendly after they reach sexual maturity, so keep handling them, it will pay off in the long run.
     
  3. Marc S

    Marc S Just Hatched

    23
    6
    16
    Jun 27, 2016
    Southern California
    That gives me hope, thank you for the reply.
     
  4. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

    9,555
    2,491
    411
    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    I had a rooster like that. He would have complete, hysterical meltdowns whenever I tried to handle him. I consulted a chicken psychologist by the name of olychickenguy, who has his own website and has posted on BYC in the past, and he helped me rehabilitate this young roo.

    It took a good three months of very careful handling to achieve this. Some chickens, just as with some people, have very excitable nervous systems, almost a chicken autism. Over time and with patience, you may be able to improve your pullet's behavior too.

    I started off just holding out my hand with his favorite treat. He took several days before he trusted me enough to take it from my hand. I did nothing more than this for a week. He learned he could trust me.

    Then I began to slowly touch his neck when he ate from my hand. I did nothing more for several days. Then I began to stroke his neck while he ate from my hand, and he allowed it.

    Slowly but surely, over time, I was able to pick him up and hold him or clean his feet when they needed it since he was a Cochin with big, feathered feet.

    There's a chance, as oldhen says, that your pullet will change after point of lay. But if she's like my cockerel was, she may get even worse after she gets her hormones. I would start working with her now.
     
  5. Marc S

    Marc S Just Hatched

    23
    6
    16
    Jun 27, 2016
    Southern California
    That's great advice, thank you!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by