I saw the fert. egg pics, but I still have a question for you all.....

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by go-veggie, Aug 2, 2008.

  1. go-veggie

    go-veggie Flew the Coop

    I understand the bullseye thing now...never knew about that, but what about the red spot? Is the only indicator of fertility the white bullseye, or is the red spot that some eggs have a sign too? Please educate me on this...
     
  2. arlee453

    arlee453 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2007
    near Charlotte NC
    A red spot on the yolk is a 'blood spot' or 'meat spot'. That's where a little extra tissue sloughs off with the actual ova when the hen ovulates.

    It does not have any correlation with fertility. A meat spot doesn't mean the egg is fertile. They are totally safe to eat also, although some folks will fish out the blood or meat spot for cosmetic reasons.
     
  3. go-veggie

    go-veggie Flew the Coop

    Quote:Thank you so much for answering my post so fast! Can I ask you one more thing...now I know that the red spot isn't anything and is not related to fertility, but do you know why it is visible in some eggs and not in others? Just curious...thanks!
     
  4. arlee453

    arlee453 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2007
    near Charlotte NC
    It's because the hen doesn't always release a bit of blood or tissue when she ovulates. It's not typical, but doesn't indicate a real problem either. Most of the time just the actual ovum is released. But sometimes there is a bit of bleeding from the ovary, or a bit of extra tissue breaks off with the ovum, and that blood/meat is captured in the egg along with the ovum as it passed thorugh the egg production tract. That's why you see it in some eggs and not others.

    Mass market egg producers candle their eggs with big automated machines and pick out any eggs with a dark spot in the yolk. That's why you don't see many store bought eggs with meat or blood spots. Those eggs are removed from the grocery egg line and sold for other purposes than table eggs.


    From: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/post.php?tid=77433

    22. What causes blood spots in eggs?

    Answer: Blood spots are the result of broken capillaries in the reproductive system. When the capillary ruptures, a drop of blood leaks out and becomes part of the egg. The presence of a blood spot does not mean the egg is fertile or that an embryo is beginning to form. Egg processors attempt to identify and remove all eggs containing blood spots before eggs go into the carton. Occasionally one is missed, but if the blood spot is small, it can be removed and the egg used. For large blood spots the egg should be discarded.​
     
  5. go-veggie

    go-veggie Flew the Coop

    Quote:
    You are just great! Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     

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