I think i have 3 males and 1 female.

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by peepsquad, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. peepsquad

    peepsquad Out Of The Brooder

    28
    0
    22
    Feb 27, 2012
    Ocklawaha Florida
    We got them in November planning to use them as pets, and tick control for our paintball field (about 40 acres). We've never had guineas so we got 5 to start with,along with 5 chicks. They have all been living together and free ranging during the day, we were hoping we'd be able to move the guineas to a coop on the field, and keep them in at night, and hopefully have keets someday, and populate slowly. Except today I realized we have 3 males and 1 female.
    Bummer. 1 egg a day, this could take a while...
     
  2. Country Chickens

    Country Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    314
    2
    131
    Sep 28, 2008
    Orange County, NC
    How did you realize this? Just wondering, cause it's easy for females to disguise themselves amongst the males. Just because she's not buckwheating doesn't make her a male...and girls will make the alarm sound, once the boys start. Course if she's showing other signs of being a boy like running on her toes with her wings raised a bit, that would be enough for me.

    Best of luck with them, either way! Your paintball field sounds awesome!
     
  3. peepsquad

    peepsquad Out Of The Brooder

    28
    0
    22
    Feb 27, 2012
    Ocklawaha Florida
    They followed us around all day, I think I may have gotten two pictures, that will help. We are going to eat dinner and then I will figure out how to post them. He wants to sell them. I want more hens... a lot more
     
  4. Country Chickens

    Country Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    314
    2
    131
    Sep 28, 2008
    Orange County, NC
    It's difficult (and often impossible) to tell a guineas sex from looking at it. Unless that's not what you meant by posting pics? Some guineas have bigger jowels, others have smaller. Our most adult male guinea (fully a year older than the rest) has the smallest jowels of our whole bunch, all of which are sexually mature. You can tell the females because they make a two-toned call, like 'come back, come back' or buckwheat' buckwheat.' You can also tell the boys because they like to run on their toes with their wings just slightly lifted at the shoulders--but they don't do this all the time.

    Sorry if I'm preaching to the choir or misunderstood you! I guess I should also ask how old these guineas are? Cause the girls don't start to make the call until, if I remember right, about four months.

    Best of luck, whatever you decide!
     
  5. peepsquad

    peepsquad Out Of The Brooder

    28
    0
    22
    Feb 27, 2012
    Ocklawaha Florida
    [​IMG]
     
  6. peepsquad

    peepsquad Out Of The Brooder

    28
    0
    22
    Feb 27, 2012
    Ocklawaha Florida
    [​IMG]
     
  7. peepsquad

    peepsquad Out Of The Brooder

    28
    0
    22
    Feb 27, 2012
    Ocklawaha Florida
    we got them all at the same time, from the feed store, about a week old or so, i believe it was November 12th. From what I understand, I will probably be lucky to ever collect an egg from a primarily free ranging guinea. As far as tick control, its not working so well, they hang out at our front door, or the back door waiting for us to come outside to "play." They have been a lot of fun. The white one in the second picture is the one that appears female, but acts male. As far as noises, that one makes the honking sort of one tone noise, if that makes any sense, the other 3 are like two tone chirps?
    we have 9 rhode island red, 2 buff orpingtons, 2 white leghorns, 2 black astrolorps, 2 barred rocks, 2 americaunas and all of them are pullets. All came from the same place. Chickens seem a lot easier, as far as sexing. I'd be one happy camper to find out someday i have 3 guinea hens, and 1 cock.
     
  8. Country Chickens

    Country Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    314
    2
    131
    Sep 28, 2008
    Orange County, NC
    Chickens are much easier to sex, that's true! Otoh, with chickens you have the issue of extra roos, which you don't have to worry about with guineas unless you want to cut down on the male/female ratio. They will all get along, at least. It sounds like you may have three females and a male, which would be the best kind of luck. Listen to the female sound here and see if that's what you're hearing. It's pretty unmistakable once you know what to listen for. If your guineas hang with the chickens and like to be around you, their eggs may not be that hard to find. I would say our guineas are mildly tame, as in, they come up to say hi and tend to follow us around the property, but don't let us get close enough to touch or handle them. So far they've laid their eggs in very easily spotted places, similar to our free-ranging chickens. Also, as your guineas continue to mature they may range a little farther. Ours only hang about when we're out there. Otherwise they continue to explore our five acres, going a little further every few days.
     
  9. GuineaLady93

    GuineaLady93 Chillin' With My Peeps

    790
    2
    113
    Aug 7, 2011
    Cameron, NC
    My Coop
    Well, here is what I see. The first picture of the White looks male. The Pearl Pied next to him also looks male. In the second picture, the Pearl and Pearl Pied look male and the White one on the left does look like a hen. Now, please understand that I can't guaranty this. When I say they look male or they look female I am going by their wattles. Wattle sexing can not be 100% because sometime male will have flat wattles and hens can have cupped wattles. The only way to tell for sure is by their call.
    Here are a couple pictures of my guineas to show you their wattles.
    This is a hen:

    [​IMG]
    This is one of my males:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2012
  10. Country Chickens

    Country Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    314
    2
    131
    Sep 28, 2008
    Orange County, NC
    See, my understanding is the wattles really depend on the genetic background of the bird. So, unless they come from the same stock, you can't tell by wattles. As I said, our dominant almost three-year-old male has no wattles to speak of. Less than the female pic above. Amongst our younger guineas it ranges and falls closer to the 'typical' male/female lines, but I would go by sound over looks every time. But, maybe that's just me?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by