I think I made a mistake in breeds

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by foreverdavis, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. foreverdavis

    foreverdavis Out Of The Brooder

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    I studied and studied for weeks trying to decide what kind of chicks to order. I decided on 5 Buff Orpington, 5 Dk Brahma, 5 Speckled Sussex, and 10 Columbian Rock Cross. I wanted 10 meat birds that grew quickly--that's not what Columbian Rock Cross is--is it? I've noticed they are growing at the same rate as the others, which made me finally figure out my mistake. Now what? I have 29 layers now--wasn't expecting that! Of course, I probably have some roosters in the mix.

    Angie
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    While I'm not entirely familiar with the breed, I'm pretty sure they are a dual purpose breed, like the brahmas. Meant for laying and/or meat. They won't grow as fast as the cornish Xs, meant as strictly meat birds.

    They can still be processed for their meat. They just take longer to get to table size.

    Someone will be along to correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  3. foreverdavis

    foreverdavis Out Of The Brooder

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    Dual breed means they lay eggs which means I would feel bad about ending their life early. So...guess I can hope for 10 roosters in the bunch. And I ordered pullets, so the ratio shouldn't be high.

    Does anyone know how long it takes regular breeds to get to "table size"?

    Angie
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2011
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:Historically dual purpose breeds meant that they were used for egglaying and then the table after their laying slowed down. Any healthy hen can lay eggs; regardless of her breed. I rescued a bunch of pullets from the commercial (meat) chicken houses. As soon as they were old enough they started laying, just like my laying hens. Huge, mostly double yoked eggs.

    I don't process chickens, so I wouldn't know when they are considered table sized.
     
  5. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Nopers, you are right [​IMG]

    They are some of the heaviest of the dual purpose birds. What's nice about them is that the females are mostly white, and the males have some yellow feathering, so you can tell them apart pretty early.

    They'll probably not reach full size until about 18 to 20 weeks.

    Um... you probably won't like this Foreverdavis, but they're noted for being docile and friendly. Sorry [​IMG]
     
  6. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,906
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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:Nopers, you are right [​IMG]

    They are some of the heaviest of the dual purpose birds. What's nice about them is that the females are mostly white, and the males have some yellow feathering, so you can tell them apart pretty early.

    They'll probably not reach full size until about 18 to 20 weeks.

    Um... you probably won't like this Foreverdavis, but they're noted for being docile and friendly. Sorry [​IMG]

    OMG! So were the meat chickens (called cobb on cobb cornish Xs) that I raised. VERY sweet. Totally focused on food, but sweet.
     
  7. foreverdavis

    foreverdavis Out Of The Brooder

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    Guess I'm going to have ALOT of eggs!

    Angie
     
  8. Mtn Margie

    Mtn Margie Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:You can sell them or barter for stuff you need. Extra eggs really come in handy for that!
     
  9. WalkerH

    WalkerH Chillin' With My Peeps

    At least you were planning on getting meaters and didn't...My mom picked up chicks and they ended up to be Cornish X, that is going to be a new experience. They should have been processed long ago, like four weeks, but stuff just keeps coming up. Luckily they weren't fed all day long, I make them go free range for their food.
     

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