I think I made a terrible mistake..

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Chick-A-Holic, May 21, 2016.

  1. Chick-A-Holic

    Chick-A-Holic Out Of The Brooder

    20
    1
    39
    Apr 22, 2015
    I put my first barch of eggs in the incubator on April 30. Lockdown on day 18, but stupid me didnt think about taking the auto egg turner out(i did shut it off though) so last night my hubby suggested I take out the turner so no chicks get their feet stuck in it. I didnt know about the shrink wrap effect. Did I give all my chicks a death sentence?
     
  2. rottlady

    rottlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    728
    119
    136
    Mar 20, 2016
    Georges Mills, NH
    highly doubtful. hens don't stay on their nest 24/7 once "lockdown" happens I have no clue where this trend comes from
     
  3. azjustin

    azjustin Chillin' With My Peeps

    264
    41
    73
    Apr 1, 2016
    Tucson, AZ
    If there are no pips, you're fine. Just do it quick and get your humidity and temp back up ASAP.

    Lightly spraying water on the eggs and incubator will help with humidity before you close it back up. Lightly spray.
     
  4. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,015
    2,479
    416
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    If you don't have external pips there is 0% chance that opening the bator caused any problems and even if you did have pips, if you have adequate humidity, the chances that it would cause any problems is slight. The whole shrink wrap thing is blown out of proportion. I am CONSTANTLY in and out of my bator during HATCH and have NEVER had it shrink wrap a pipper or zipper. Now, there is greater chance that a pipper will have memebranes dry out around the pip hole and adhere to the chick which can cause complications if you are not observant. But seldom will opening the bator cause the total certain doom that is spread throughout the hatching community with fearmongering. There is nothing wrong with being hands off and keeping the incubator closed as a precaution, but there is something wrong with being made to fear opening the bator is case you need too. Just make sure that your humidity is up and your intervention is timely and that your humidity comes right back up after you close it. Good luck with your hatch!
     
  5. RubyNala97

    RubyNala97 Overrun With Chickens

    4,410
    662
    291
    Apr 9, 2015
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Some people, including myself at times, do not "lockdown" on day 18. Depending on the size of air cells some people will only lockdown once they get their first pip. My lockdown is definitely contingent upon air cell size. When I candle and see the air cells are starting to get ready for hatch I go ahead and increase humidity. Don't worry! I would go ahead and take the turner out.
     
  6. Chick-A-Holic

    Chick-A-Holic Out Of The Brooder

    20
    1
    39
    Apr 22, 2015
    Thanks for the replies everyone! I didnt have any pips when I opened the incubator. My humidity has been at 55-60 for the incubation period.

    I do have another problem though... it's day 23 and I still have NO pips. I'm getting ready to try the float test now, but I'm not holding my breath for movement. Every once in awhile it does seem like a few eggs change positions though, so there mighr still be some living chicks.
     
  7. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,015
    2,479
    416
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    55-60% is quite high for the first 17 days. Most hatches at that humidity will result in chicks drowing at hatch time in the excess fluid left in the egg due to the egg not loosiing enough moisture because of high humidity in the incubator.
     
  8. Chick-A-Holic

    Chick-A-Holic Out Of The Brooder

    20
    1
    39
    Apr 22, 2015
    Amy, that was what the directions said(I know, should have done more research before trusting them) what is an acceptable range for the next time i attempt a hatch?

    The water yeilded no results(all eggs were still) so I candled them. About half "looked" right. One chick thumped against the shell while I was turning it(possible dead chick, but also possibly alive?) The thump chick did not have a visible air cell on the bottom of the egg, when I flipped it over to look into the top of the egg, that is when I felt the thump and there was visible air space at the top.
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,015
    2,479
    416
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    A lot of the manufacture's instructions list a much too high humidity. I hate those things. They don't take many variables into consideration when they throw out those numbers or tell a hatcher to fill x amount of wells. Different people have success at different rates. People in high altitudes do need a higher humidity. For everyone else I HIGHLY recommend a low humidity incubatioin and checking the air cells to be able to tell if and when you need to adjust. Myself, I incubate at 30% for the first 17 days. If I can run dry and stay near that level I do. I never use my wells during the first 17 days. Here's some more info you might find usefull, it's the method I use: http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com...anuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity

    What make and model incubator are you using and what temps are you running at?
     
  10. Chick-A-Holic

    Chick-A-Holic Out Of The Brooder

    20
    1
    39
    Apr 22, 2015
    I have a Farm Innovators 4200. I have not been using the thermometer it came with, I am using one that I know is accurate and have kept it at 99.5 the whole incubation. No spikes, no drops(I am a stay at home mom and have been watching it like a hawk)
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by