I think my goat has a cold.

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by mdoerge, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. mdoerge

    mdoerge Out Of The Brooder

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    May 17, 2008
    NE Ohio
    My 4 month old Nigerian Dwarf doe started with a little bit of a runny nose (clear) yesterday and an occasional cough. From what I've read, it just sounds like a cold. She has a great appetite and is acting totally normal. Do I need to be concerned? Is there anything I should be doing for her? Will my other goat catch it as well? Do I sound like a newbie?! [​IMG] I've only had them three weeks. Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    It could be a host of things. You should get her temperature.
     
  3. toddntiff

    toddntiff Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 10, 2008
    New Mexico
    I've had goats for all of one week, but here is what I've learned...
    stress causes crazy things to happen to animals, so it could be the stress of the new environment. It could also be an allergy to something. One of ours coughs because of the dust so we've had to adjust the way we feed and where we cut up the hay for the goats. She seems to be doing better because of that. Keep an eye on her and watch her eyes, nose, etc. Use your judgement and call someone who has had goats longer to come and check her out if you are really worried. Most of the time vets don't know about these kind of animals and you end up spending money that you don't need to.
     
  4. ruth

    ruth Life is a Journey

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    Jul 8, 2007
    Woodville, MS
    I got my Nigerian Dwarfs a couple of months ago and some were also 4 and 5 months old and some were older. I had one that coughed a lot. Took her to vet and her lungs were clear and she was fine. Turns out goats cough a lot, especially when stressed or when running. Same goat ended up breaking her leg so she's been living in kennel in house. She was a runt and I think they just played too hard and were jumping too much.

    Here's a link to the most informative goat site around. If you haven't already visited it, please do so. I learned so much from her. For a simple cold she doesn't recommend any meds but you can find dosages on all meds - seems goats require much higher dosages than the label says for other animals.

    http://fiascofarm.com/goats/

    Enjoy your goats. I'm really enjoying mine.
     
  5. mdoerge

    mdoerge Out Of The Brooder

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    May 17, 2008
    NE Ohio
    I do refer to fiascofarm.com frequently - you're right ruth, what an awesome resource! I did feel better when I read what she said about a cold, but of course being a new goat mom, I'm still worried. I'm going to call the breeder I bought her from today. I know she'll come over if I ask her to. I'm just trying not to overreact to everything. Taking a goat's temperature... I haven't found any info other than what a normal temp is. I assume it is done rectally. Do I just use the same kind of thermometer I have for my kids (children!)?
     
  6. ThreeBoysChicks

    ThreeBoysChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Thurmont, MD
    Basically, it looks like a rectal thermometer. But you should tape a piece of string on the end of it. Never have needed to take my goats temp, but I know with a horse or a cow, the thermometer can slip all the way in and you don't want that to happen. So be safe and tape a piece of string on the end. My vet has a thermometer that has a steel cable and a clip on the end.

    Good luck with your goat. Does it have goat friends?

    Edited for Typo
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2008
  7. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    Yup, rectally. I use a digital thermometer with a string on it, as suggested.

    Getting her temp will give you peace of mind. Could be a cold, could be dusty hay/shavings, could be allergies. The only other thing it could be with no fever is lungworm, but if you're using a good deworming program, that shouldn't be the issue.

    If she has a fever...then you'll know further research and antibiotic treatment is necessary. There is a strain of cocci that causes runny nose and eyes - and cocci can be pushed into action when an animal is stressed (ie moved in your case). URIs are also common with stress...

    So, get that temp and go from there. [​IMG]
     
  8. Chatychick

    Chatychick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 9, 2007
    Blue Mound, Kansas
    Sounds like streas or maybe a cold or allergies...I would get a temp on her and if its over 103 then treat with banamine and vitamin c.Crush the vitamin c and add to feed anyway...just the type you can get at Wal-mart. I do this when the weather changes. Dusty hay can cause a cough. When was she last wormed???Some types of cooughs are catching but most arent. I would try the Vit C and get a temp on her first.
     
  9. mdoerge

    mdoerge Out Of The Brooder

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    May 17, 2008
    NE Ohio
    Okay, I went to TSC after work and got a thermometer. Her temp is 102.8. Is this considered normal? She is still eating and acting the same as always. She was wormed before I got her, the end of July I think. I talked to the breeder today, but forgot to ask her exactlly when. I'll have to call again and ask. She had cocci August 28 (I took a fecal sample to my vet), so I treated both goats. My other one got cocci last week, so I treated them both again. They both have normal poop now.
     
  10. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    If you're only treating for cocci once...you're not getting it, only slowing it down. The ONLY way to get rid of cocci is a 14 to 21 day treatment. If you are treating any less than that, you're simply producing an antibiotic resistant strain.

    That temp is good, though. Whew.
     

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