I think we have Cocci...... what do I do?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lindz8504, Oct 7, 2013.

  1. lindz8504

    lindz8504 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I went down this morning and noticed some bloody poo in my broody coop that has a hen and 7 chicks in it. The chicks are 4 weeks old. I haven't noticed them being lethargic or anything, but they are a little "ratty" looking which I attributed to them starting to feather out. I know that I need to treat everyone in the coop, and probably everyone else because they have access to the area around the coop and under it. What do I need to use and what is the dosage? I am not getting any eggs right now, but if they start laying while under treatment how long do I need to throw those away? Any help is greatly appreciated because I really don't want to lose any of these chicks!
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    To treat for coccidiosis I would start by getting some Corid or Amrol from a feed store. It's found in the cattle section and sold as liquid, which I prefer and powder.

    The the liquid dose is 2 teaspoons (.024% level) per gallon for 5-7 days.
    The powder dose is 1.5 teaspoons (.024% level) per gallon for 5-7 days.

    FDA recommendations:
    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/details.cfm?dn=013-149
    "Chickens
    Indications: For the treatment of coccidiosis.
    Amount: Administer at the 0.012 percent level in drinking water as soon as coccidiosis is diagnosed and continue for 3 to 5 days (in severe outbreaks, give amprolium at the 0.024 percent level); continue with 0.006 percent amprolium-medicated water for an additional 1 to 2 weeks."


    And this link has these instructions:
    http://www.drugs.com/vet/amprol-9-6-solution-can.html
    "Poultry - as Soon As Caecal Coccidiosis Is Diagnosed, Give 0.024% Amprolium In The Drinking Water For 5 To 7 Days. Continue The Treatment With 0.006% Amprolium Medicated Water For An Additional One To Two Weeks. No Other Source Of Drinking Water Should Be Available To The Birds During This Time."

    -Kathy
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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  4. lindz8504

    lindz8504 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you very much!
     
  5. Noobchick

    Noobchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Was the poop bright red or brownish red? Was it stringy looking like snot or did it look like someone got a nosebleed and dripped blood in your coop?

    I ask because growing chicks (and grown chickens) shed intestinal lining. It's normal, to be expected, and there's no need to medicate.

    Here's a website that may help identify what you saw:
    http://chat.allotment.org/index.php?topic=17568.0



    (Edited to correct stupid iPad keyboard spelling errors)
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
  6. lindz8504

    lindz8504 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It looked more like a nosebleed.... then there was some runny poo with blood in it as well....
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    That chart has poops labeled normal that are not! Don't trust it!

    -Kathy
     
  8. Noobchick

    Noobchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nosebleed-like? Bright red? Then probably coccidiosis. Dosage posted is correct. Be sure not to give any vitamin supplements while treating for coccidiosis- the vitamins will interfere with the medicine working and it'll take longer for your birds to recover. Birds should start to recover within a day or two. If you see bloody stools past two days, watch the birds for a bit to see which ones are pooping blood. It could be that they're not drinking as much water/meds as they should. For those chicks, dip their beaks in the water, as you would to teach a newly hatched chick to drink. Do that several times a day and continue monitoring their bedding for blood.
     
  9. Noobchick

    Noobchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm curious: which ones are mislabeled?
     
  10. lindz8504

    lindz8504 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes bright red... I actually thought maybe someone had gotten cut or something but didn't see any wounds.
     

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