I thought broody rocks were rare?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by lilmarie84, Mar 27, 2018.

  1. lilmarie84

    lilmarie84 Songster

    367
    341
    136
    Mar 28, 2017
    Kenner, LA.
    I have 3 plymoths rocks 2 white and 1 barred now the barred is adopted but the whites I bought as part of my 1st flock. Now when I bought my chicks last year I picked my 2 BO's for their broodiness I only wanted 2 broody hens and when I picked all the others I picked ones the said poor or infrequent. Now I have one of my WRs that I think is trying to go broody on me.

    Yesterday around 1 went to check the boxes and she was in the 1st one so I grabbed the eggs out of the other box and when I went out side just to check on my girls (because as long as Im home I let them free range in the backyard)I noticed that she was missing so I went to check the box and she was still in there. I go back in to do homework with the kids. When I went back to lock up the coop I checked and she was still in the box.

    Today she was out of the box when I let everyone out and she ran out with them and was out for a good while but then i go out at 10 and she was in the other box to shorten this story some she is still in there now.

    Is she trying to go broody on me?
     
  2. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

    7,126
    8,615
    556
    Feb 14, 2014
    Consett Co.Durham. UK
    You will only know if she is broody if she stays on the nest day and night, stops laying eggs and exhibits broody behaviour like fluffing up and growling when you approach her nest or head down and tail flared clucking when she does leave the nest to eat.
    There are a number of reasons why she might be spending lots of time in the nest box and broodiness is just one of them. If she is not going broody then she may be having a problem laying, perhaps egg bound or laying shell less eggs which are very difficult to pass or perhaps salpingitis, or she may be ill with something unrelated to her reproductive system and using the nest box for comfort, or she may be being bullied or over mated and using it as a sanctuary. Only you know your hen and see her every day and can assess these things. Just because a particular breed does not have a tendency to going broody does not mean an individual hen of that breed will not get the urge. Just that the likelihood is less. Similarly, there is no guarantee that either of your BOs will go broody.
     
    aart likes this.
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

    59,589
    47,742
    1,327
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    Did you let her sleep in the nest?

    Great description here.

    I give them 3 days and nights before calling 'broody', then decide whether to move them to the broody area with fake eggs, let them settle there for a day or so before giving fresh fertile eggs.....or break them in the broody breaker crate.
     
  4. lilmarie84

    lilmarie84 Songster

    367
    341
    136
    Mar 28, 2017
    Kenner, LA.
    I did leave her in the box but the next day after going out to eat and free range for a bit she jumped into the other box and for the whole day
     
  5. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

    7,126
    8,615
    556
    Feb 14, 2014
    Consett Co.Durham. UK
    This is part of the problem with communal nest boxes for broody hens. What usually happens is that the broody gets up to eat and drink and then when she comes back another hen is in her nest, laying an egg. She climbs into the adjacent nest box to wait and then goes into a broody trance and doesn't realise that she is on the wrong nest by the time the other hen gets out. If she had been given fertile eggs they may well have been spoilt by getting cold. This is why it is best to set up a broody hen in her own nest away from the communal nests, so that she doesn't get confused. Sometimes a broody hen will not settle to being moved though and it always takes several days for her to learn where her new nest is, so it is best to wait a few days after moving her before you give her fertile eggs. If she still doesn't settle, then I block her in her chosen communal nest with a piece of plywood across the front or a cardboard box over the top with holes drilled in it and let her out once a day to eat and poop/dust bath etc whilst I do chores and then fasten her back in when she returns to her nest. That way I can guide her into the correct nest if she gets it wrong and ensure that no new eggs have been deposited in it by other hens whilst she was off.
    Not saying your hen is definitely committed to being broody yet, and you have not mentioned that she is showing other broody signs, but if she is and you decide to set eggs, make sure you dust the nest box and bedding material with either DE or Louse Powder before you set eggs because broody hens are a magnate for red mites.

    Best of luck

    Barbara
     
    lazy gardener likes this.
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,616
    907
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    Good posts, Barbara. I agree that dusting the nest box is a good pre-emptive maneuver. I remember when I was a kid with my first flock. I went running to my dad in tears b/c one of my hens was "dying". He came out and took a look at her, and started laughing. We had "the talk" about "when a hen decides to hatch eggs". He then showed me how to dust the nest, and supervised my supervision of my first broody hen.

    I have a friend (Beekissed) who's flock consists primarily of White Rocks. She has great success with the WR going broody.

    If I am blessed with a broody this season, I will move her to a dedicated broody area so she can brood in peace without her nest being interrupted by the other gals. Actually built my coop with those options in mind! I have 3 separate areas that can be set up as a broody suite, complete with outdoor access.
     
    rebrascora likes this.
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

    59,589
    47,742
    1,327
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    I learned this the hard way....dust the bird and the box and the bedding.

    What a great story!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: