I want a Emu and need Adivice!

Discussion in 'Ostriches, Emu, Rheas' started by Cluckcluck1215, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. Cluckcluck1215

    Cluckcluck1215 Overrun With Chickens

    Hi!im from ME.

    I currently have a flock of 11 chickens and one duck.abd I have 63 archers of land.so I decid, ok, how about Emus?right.i don't have any yet, but I do need so,e advice.

    What can I feed them?
    how long do they live?
    How many feet per bird?
    How tall are they?
    Are they ok around kids?
    How long will they lay?
    How many females should I have per male?

    Thanks, cluck cluck.
     
  2. Vermont Poultry

    Vermont Poultry Out Of The Brooder

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    Northern Vermont
    I myself do not have emus, but I know couple people who do. Its not like getting chickens, its definitely more of a commitment and requires more effort and money. One of the people I knew who had emus didn't go well, not exactly sure why but be careful. I know some emus get up to 6 feet and 130 pounds, pretty big bird! It takes around 18 - 24 months for one to completely mature. So ide imagine it would be like feeding a teenager. They need lots of run space, preferable a long rectangle, and the fence must be at least 6 foot. Emus if raised by hand are very friendly and docile, but they will stomp any intruder, like a wandering chicken or a small dog. People have raised emus and chickens together with great success, but being such a large creature accidents happen, especially when a 100 pound bird is running 30 mph into a flock of chickens. Emus do not take kindly to new members of the flock, I've heard many of times were an emu has killed newcomers. Emus overall are great for some people and not an option for others. I was going to get emus but I couldn't afford it, maybe next year for me. Oh and housing can be as simple as a shed, protection from wind is a must in cold weather. Almost all of the info I provided is based on what ive heard from others and what I have researched, so make sure to verify before using the information. Research is your best friend for such a big thing as raising emus.
     
  3. Cluckcluck1215

    Cluckcluck1215 Overrun With Chickens

    Great!Yeah...
     
  4. briefvisit

    briefvisit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What can I feed them? depends on your budget. others here are better qualified on this.
    how long do they live? 10-20 years?
    How many feet per bird? Absolutely as much space as you can give them. Personally, I think anything less than a pen a half a mile wide is cruel (and if you knew the birds in the wild, you'd know why I feel this way!)
    How tall are they? about five feet while walking; about six while upright
    Are they ok around kids? if emus are raised from eggs, they are apparently amazingly tame. (I can stroke a tame-wild bird's neck while it scoffs wheat. Just for a few seconds.) Any emu is dangerous if cornered and frightened. Sometimes -- 'cause they got no hands -- they 'beak' things to investigate them. Looks like a peck, but it's just beaking. Felicity once beaked the lens of my sunglasses, and I nearly died of fright. But if the kids understand how Emooo 'works,' you'll never have problems: don't frighten them; don't try to corner them
    How long will they lay? Don't quite know -- but should be a decade.
    How many females should I have per male? Tee hee -- best read up on the species, cluckcluck: gynocentric . . . females in charge. Thus, how many males per female? Others know better than I, but 'breeding-pairs' is gonna be the pivot of your project.

    se
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2016
  5. Cluckcluck1215

    Cluckcluck1215 Overrun With Chickens

    Wow!20years!!rhanks so much!also, were can I Buy hatching Eggs?can I use a regular homemade chicken icubator?can I have just One?
     
  6. briefvisit

    briefvisit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sigh: Cluckcluck, a few years ago, this site was the best in the world. Seriously. But things have become quiet. My point is that I am emooo a la wilde.* The U.S. guys are the experts in hatching. You'll have to hang out here until some turn up.

    *Male sits on the eggs. Keeps sitting. Eventually, chicks appear. Male and chicks depart into the bush.
     
  7. KadenL

    KadenL Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 22, 2016
    Scottsdale Arizona

    Incubation is not the same for chickens and emus, however it is close. They need to lose 15% of their original weight while incubating up until the last day- between 49-54 days depending in the temperature of the incubator. 95.7-97.5° F develops strong, hardy chicks, but they can take up to 55-58 days to hatch. Higher temperature incubation will cause a faster hatch but a higher probability for weaker chicks and even a higher mortality rate if the temperature ranges into the danger zone. Don't let it reach above 101.3° because you risk overheating the chicks once they begin to develop since they will start creating their own body heat. Also, dont try to rule out any eggs because of candling, as its very difficult because of the thick shell.

    This is just my research as I wish to own emu as well, and most if the info came from the big birds thread, so I suggest you check it all out. It's really helpful.
     
  8. KadenL

    KadenL Out Of The Brooder

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    Scottsdale Arizona
    You're also going to need a few acres if you plan to have more than one bird. Im purchasing two hatching eggs and I won't purchase any more because o a space limitation, and I have about 1.5 acres. They need room to run and spread their legs. (Their Looooong legs) they can run quickly too so you want to give them enough room to get their energy out so they don't get frustrated and stagnant
     
  9. KadenL

    KadenL Out Of The Brooder

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    Scottsdale Arizona
    Also, as for feeding, you can mix chick starter, rabbit pellets, and regular chicken or duck feed in equal parts along with allowing your emu to graze in order to give them the balanced, fiber filled diet they need. Also, they need to eat dirt and small rocks to help them digest, so be aware of that and keep some small pebbles around for them. Also, FOOD GRADE diatomaceous earth is good to sprinkle in their adult food to help them get calcium and help them fight off disease. Get them vaccinated- before you buy, ask if they've been vaccinated, and if not, find a vet who is qualified and is willing to work with such large animal.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2016
  10. Cluckcluck1215

    Cluckcluck1215 Overrun With Chickens

    Ok, I didn't know that there Incu. Time/tempt. Had to be different then chickens, although I've never hatched them.
    I think I've got plenty of land ;) I have 65+ acres of land, plus a HUGE field in my yard were i plan to put them.

    Interesting, Rabbit pellets?odd.thanks!
     

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