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I want to get a cockatiel!

Discussion in 'Caged Birds - Finches, Canaries, Cockatiels, Parro' started by Chicks Galore3, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    Dec 16, 2011
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    Hello all cockatiel owners! I really, really, really want a cockatiel. My cousins have 2 budgies I think they are the greatest thing since sliced bread. I want a bird who is a little more trainable and bigger. Thus a cockatiel. I have done some research on a cockatiel forum. I am still a little concerned with noise and night frights. What do you do to deal with these?
     
  2. Synthem

    Synthem Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 6, 2013
    Houston, Texas
    Hello! I have never owned cockatiels, although I would love to own one as well, however I noticed that you want a bird who is "a little more trainable." I am not sure who told you that cockatiels are more trainable than budgies, but in a general, species specific sense, I find that hard to believe. Budgerigars are able to do everything that a larger parrot can. They can learn the basics, like step up, almost any trick under the sun, and they can even learn to talk!

    However — and this goes for all parrot and parakeet species — birds are individuals! Their behavior, sociability, cuddliness and trainability will depend highly on the bird. Getting a bird at a young age is not a good indication of what they will be like after they reach maturity, so the only real way to ensure that "what you see is what you get" is to adopt through a rescue. This can be hard to do, but there are several great bird rescues in America, so depending on where you live it might actually be a good option!

    That said, the one thing that almost all cockatiels exceed at is whistling songs. I personally find that super cute!

    Another important thing to know is that cockatiels (and all cockatoo birds) are powder birds! If anyone in your house has asthma, lung disease, or as sensitive respiratory condition, you will need a high quality air filter. The fine dust that 'tiel feathers produce can cause all kinds of breathing problems if you're at all sensitive to that type of thing.

    I have never owned cockatiels personally, but I have spent over a year researching varies species of pet birds, especially parrots, and would be happy to share the information I've collected and valuable online resources with you over PM if you would be interested. Just let me know! c:
     
  3. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

    8,134
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    Dec 16, 2011
    Iowa
     
  4. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

    x2, I wouldn't say that I had a very good experience with my cockateil, I find that chickens suit me better
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  5. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut Premium Member

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    Dec 16, 2011
    Iowa
    What about cockatiels didn't suit you?
     
  6. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

    They are more demanding than chickens, from what I'm used to.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  7. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    I live with some one with lung problems. He strongly suggests talking with your brother's dr before bringing a bird home.
     
  8. Synthem

    Synthem Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 6, 2013
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    For sure. Cockatiels, like most companion parrots, require a minimum of 1 — 2 hours of out of cage time per day. Otherwise, they will almost always revert to being wild, and you will be unable to handle them. Parrots are flock birds, and will become depressed and develop self mutilating habits if their social need is not met. This either means plenty of playtime with their human family, or being kept with another cockatiel (in a pair.)
     
  9. Synthem

    Synthem Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 6, 2013
    Houston, Texas
    May I recommend looking into Green Cheek Conures? The initial price of buying them can be more expensive than a cockatiel, but in the long run their upkeep is much the same. They are not powder birds and although all birds create some amount of dust, they will not create as much as a cockatiel and won't bother your brother as much. Not only this, but they are extremely trainable, they are a somewhat larger bird (still small, but larger than a budgie,) relatively quiet compared to other conures (louder than budgies, though,) and most are very cuddly! They form incredibly strong bonds with their owners.

    Conures in general make great pets, but they are a larger bird and a larger bird means a larger voice! Sun Conures and Nanday Conures have calls louder than an jet engine, and are not recommended for people who have never owned a parrot before. However, Green Cheek Conures are quieter, their calls are not as high pitched, and they are actually recommended for beginners. They come in several color mutations and run about $150—$300 from a breeder and $400 from a general pet store.
     
  10. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes I know about that information, I studied and read about Cockatiels before I bought mine. I found that Cockateils don't fit my schedule. Before getting her I had a budgie who had died recently, I liked budgies so I thought that a Cockateil wouldn't be much different. But it also depends on where you get your bird from. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013

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