I want to learn more about taking care of wounds on ducks

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by arrowti, Jun 10, 2016.

  1. arrowti

    arrowti Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So yesterday, our pekin Fatty was killed by some animal we haven't determined (probably a fox or dog). I found her, alive, in the woods after I saw her white feathers from the house, and whatever grabbed her ran off. It seemed to have trouble carrying her because of her large, heavy size (she was extremely heavy, much more heavy than the cayugas, and very bulky). She had bleeding bite wounds on the back of her neck, lower on her back, and on her chest. The one on her chest was so deep it punctured right to her thoracic cavity. When I found her I didn't see that wound though, and saw only the wounds on her back, which had soaked through a lot of her feathers.

    She seemed stun and was breathing hard (opening her mouth with every breath), but I assumed she was in shock rather than realizing she had a fatal injury. My first thought was to get her into warm water to wash the injuries so I could treat them... unfortunately, she died just a few minutes after putting her in the tub. There were maybe 3-4 inches of water, and it was all turned red, and there were clots of it in the tub. Obviously nothing could have saved her from that, but in case there is a salvageable injury later on, I would like to know before hand what is best to do.

    We have wound spray, corn starch (to stop bleeding) and gauze with tape. What else should we keep on hand?

    When you find an injured duck, what do you do first? Was I wrong to instantly bring her to the water to clean the injuries? Should I have tried something else first (maybe corn starch?) Any advice is appreciated... I sure hope whatever comes back, if it comes back, gets stopped before it kills anything else.
     
  2. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    So very sorry for your loss.

    This may help some https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/621438/duck-emergency-attack-wounds-graffic-pics
     
  3. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Sad for your loss.

    There is a sticky on medical kits to have for ducks - many of us contributed lists of things that could be helpful especially for wounds.

    I think you did the right thing. One of the reasons to get a duck to the tub is to rinse off blood and assess extent of injuries. There is a product used to stop bleeding in deep wounds. It comes in packets. I cannot recall the product name.

    But I did find this - http://www.revmedx.com/#!xstat-dressing/c2500
     
  4. arrowti

    arrowti Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you both for your responses!

    I'll see if I can find that product. The xstat looks good but I think we'd need a veterinarian after to remove the sponges and treat her - unfortunately we don't have a vet who will work with poultry anywhere in our area. There was so much blood on her that I could barely see her injuries to begin with, but even when I put her in the tub it was replaced by blood as quickly as it was washed off.

    Fortunately the predator hasn't returned yet. We are thinking it was a dog.
     
  5. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Best way to avoid this happening again is to make sure any breach is taken care of then you can relax and not worry and your remaining flock will be safe. It takes a bit of work but well worth it not to have to imagine what your duck Fatty went through and what you had to go through to try and save her. [​IMG]
     
  6. arrowti

    arrowti Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I believe it was our fault - we had taken down the electric wire blocking the enclosure from the woods in order to do some work on the pig pens without having to step over 5 feet of electric fence while carrying 100+ pound pens... and didn't put them back up.

    It's possible the dog could have jumped over the regular fence (which is about 4 feet, non-electric), but easier is usually better, I'd say. The hot wire is back up now, and no sign of the predator. We've lost no more animals other than a hen who had been sick with ascites for awhile who reached the point where she was suffering rather than enjoying life.

    i really want really a really tall metal enclosure to avoid animals jumping in, that is electrified... but that requires more money than we have at the moment so we're taking extra precautions with what we have now.

    First time since we started raising animals (over 4 years) that we lost something to a predator, so we had been, prior to this, a little lax about security which resulted in not putting that wire back up. It was bound to happen. Shame it had to happen to Fatty, our last pekin from the six we hatched..
     
  7. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    We don't even have electric fence only no climb horse fence and thankfully we have never had a predator get in during the day. My dachshunds bark so much the probably keep most away. I am so sorry for your loss.
     

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