I want to make sure I have this right; so I'm asking all in one post

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Momagain1, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. Momagain1

    Momagain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 13, 2011
    Central IL
    1. Chicks are coming next week:

    first hr: sugar water only (??)1/4 cup sugar per gallonsolid foods to start on 2nd day is that right???

    Then I can set out regular water &

    start with: 20% chick starter medicated (is what I've read) for up to 8 wks
    then 18% grower from 8 to 15 wks
    then 16% complete layer from 16 wks to WHEN???

    No grains during chick-time
    what do we use or should avoid in our chicken food..



    TREATS:

    When do we start when they are completely off the starter/grower and complete formulas???

    Can we get a large bag of traditional bird seeds to scatter?


    **When we feed; do we/should we go ahead and scatter regular feed on the ground for the pecking??
    or do we save that for treats??

    Do they really NEED treats??

    I have a field next to me that has either:
    soybeans, corn (feed corn), alfalfa...
    can we feed any/all of that??? maybe the soybean plants aftrer the harvester hass came through??

    I SO APPRECIATE YOUR HELP!!!
     
  2. Ukyou

    Ukyou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 3, 2010
    TREATS:

    When do we start when they are completely off the starter/grower and complete formulas???

    Can we get a large bag of traditional bird seeds to scatter?


    **When we feed; do we/should we go ahead and scatter regular feed on the ground for the pecking??
    or do we save that for treats??

    Do they really NEED treats??

    They don't NEED treats. We NEED to feed them treats [​IMG] Mine started to get treats right in the beginning, but healthy treats because we wanted to act like a mother hen that would bring the tasty stuff to her chicks and I feel it helps to trame them.​
     
  3. acid_chipmunk

    acid_chipmunk Polish Silkies d'Uccles O my!

    Mar 29, 2010
    I don't use sugar water on my chicks, but I do use Vitamins and Electrolytes.

    I use Purina Start and Grow Medicated, so no need to switch to a grower (which we don't have here anyway)

    No layer food until they start laying. They will be fine without it. Just put out free choice oyster and they will eat it if they need it.

    Treats are not needed, but can be helpful in getting your chicks to like you. If you feed them anything other than their regular feed or scrambled eggs and yogurt, they must have grit. Chick grit for the little ones, not parakeet grit you can get at the pet store!



    Good luck with your chicks and [​IMG]
     
  4. Momagain1

    Momagain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 13, 2011
    Central IL
    Quote:Free choice oyster?? what is that and why do we need it??

    and grit??? oiy! head spinning...

    THANK YOU GUYS BOTH!!
     
  5. msdoolittle

    msdoolittle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 28, 2009
    You can buy oyster shell at a feed store, specifically for chickens. They will not need this until they begin to lay, which is usually around 5-6 months or so. The oyster shell will remain in the gizzard (grinding organ of the chicken) for some time, and it releases calcium (which gives you good strong eggshells and healthy hens) as it is being broken down. You provide oyster shell 'free choice', meaning that you put out a little pan or dish of it and the chickens will take it if they want it. That's what 'free choice' is. They can take it or leave it.

    As stated, you do not need grit unless you are feeding baby chicks foods other than the starter. I don't feed treats while they are this age, because I try to keep things uncomplicated. I take a little bit of the feed in the palm of my hand, and the babies will come and peck it out. I've always has friendly chicks. It's really just about how much time you devote to them...chickens are smart birds and they quickly figure out where the food comes from. I handle my baby chicks a few times a day, after the first few days. I do give them a few days to acclimate to the new surroundings.

    Depending on your starter, you may be able to continue to use it as a grower ration. You just need to read your bag's instructions. I have used Purina Start N' Grow with no problems.

    I also use a vitamin/electrolyte mix for the first day or so, if I receive them in the mail. It can also be bought at a feed store or store that sells livestock needs like Tractor Supply or Atwood's.

    Don't worry, you'll do just fine. As long as they're warm enough and have food and water, you should have no major problems!
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2011
  6. Mak

    Mak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 12, 2009
    Londonderry, NH
    I always put food and water out right away. They seem to head right for the food. I have given my chicks hard boiled egg, chopped up fine, after a few days to a week. They love it! And then start adding more treats- chopped cooked veggies, fruits, etc- but all chopped pretty finely so they can eat it easily. And once they start on that stuff, I put a pan of sand in the brooder. They will eat it for grit and also use it to dust bathe. Nothing cuter than a tiny, fluffy chick rolling around in a pile o' sand!

    Have fun with them!
     
  7. chuckzoo

    chuckzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2009
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    You seem well prepared to you may know this; you will need to teach them to drink by dipping each ones beak in the water when you first get them.

    I started offering very small amounts of treats i.e. chopped tomatoe, tiny bits of lettuce, fruit at three weeks.

    It is so much fun watching them try new things but one has to ensure you don't dilute out their feed by offering too many treats.
     
  8. Momagain1

    Momagain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 13, 2011
    Central IL
    Quote:actually I did NOT know that! Thanks!

    I prob wont offer treats til they are in the coop, if at all..maybe table scraps :)
     
  9. dsqard

    dsqard Crazy "L" Farms

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    Jun 11, 2010
    York PA
    I put food and water out in the brooder before the chicks. I like to use paper towels in the bottom of my brooder for the first week (mine is a large plastic tote) so they can grip the "floor" easier with their feet. I use white paper towels and just sprinkle some food on the towels so the chicks will peck at the food and learn what it is. After the first week I use pine shavings on the floor. Try not to get too wrapped up. They are really pretty resilliant as long as they have food, water and are warm.
     
  10. scbatz33

    scbatz33 No Vacancy, Belfry Full

    Jan 23, 2009
    South GA
    When the chicks first arrive you need to make sure you have everything all set up. They will be peeping and fussing like crazy and you want them to go into a warm brooder with food and water at the ready.

    Dip the beaks in tepid to warm water. Not cold! Their little bodies will already bee stressed form the shipping and cold water can send them into shock. I do not use sugar water unless they are really really bad off and I have nothing else to give. You can actually cause them more problems than it helps. If you wanted to do electrolytes for a boost. Pedialyte(sp) is good. The plain kind.

    I feed chick starter at a 24% for the first 8 weeks. Then to a starter/grower like Flock Raiser (20%) to 16 weeks. At that point I mix in a grain based feed (18%) and they get that plus grit all mixed together with the Flock Raiser until 20 weeks. At 20+ weeks they have a pelleted layer feed(16%) mixed with the grain based feed and grit and oyster shell.

    I have orpingtons. I find the higher protein levels help them to feather out better and put on a solid weight since they are a larger bird.

    They get "treats" as I have them...ie raw veg and such....but it is not something I give on a regular basis and not until they are consuming grit or out free ranging and are able to pick up rocks and such to aid in digestion.

    "I have a field next to me that has either:
    soybeans, corn (feed corn), alfalfa...
    can we feed any/all of that??? maybe the soybean plants aftrer the harvester hass came through??"

    If you read the feed tags, these are products that are in your feed already. If you are looking to feed them raw, again the plant material should not be given until they are at an age to consume grit to aid in digestion.
     

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