I want to raise bees for honey

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by AHappychick, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. AHappychick

    AHappychick Wanna-be Farmer

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    I remember from last year when I started to read about it that everything is ordered before spring. Can someone direct me as to where I can learn up on it and any other info that might seem important?

    My Organic garden is a good distance from my chooks and I always grow a lot of flowers to attract bees already and this just seems like the next logical step.

    I dont need a lot maybe 1 or 2 boxes is this a bad idea? I will read up on it of course and not just jump into it but this is my beginning stage. [​IMG]

    My biggest concern is getting stung, is that something that happens a lot? will they sting me as I tend to my garden, or should I put them away from the veggies and just make a flower bed for them? Before I do anything I want to decide on an area first. [​IMG] I know that is probably a silly question but I disturbed some bees last year that were pollinating a bush by my fence gate and when I opened the gate I was divebombed and stung 6 times in the neck and head before I was able to run squeeling like a pig. [​IMG]

    Do bees take up a lot of time? I am already stretched pretty thin but if it is similar to raising meal worms (in time that is) then I could manage it [​IMG]
     
  2. beerman

    beerman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am getting bees also, from what I have read (this is all from what I have read)a hive will cost you 40 hours of work per year. Some beekeepers say they get stung once or twice a year. they also say most stings are NOT from honey bees.
    Hope this helps.
    look up bees on the search here some people posted me some great bee sites.
    Brian
     
  3. schmije

    schmije Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's definitely the time of year to start getting ready for bees. Somebody else asked me about bees yesterday, because I mention them in my signature. I had DH, Steve, put togetether some info for her, so I'll email it to you too.

    As for your concern about stinging - it hasn't been much of a problem for us. We have two hives that sit right next to our compost and garden, so we're close to them all the time. I've only been stung once, and that was because I walked through the yard in flip flops, and one slipped under the strap of my shoe. Steve has been stung several times, but they've all been when he was working with the bees without a hood or gloves. He finds it easier to work them without the bulky gloves, and he's willing to take the risk. I always wear a hood if I'm working with the hives, because they're attracted to breath, so they fly close to my face. The hood isn't necessary in the garden, even though it's very close to the hives.
     
  4. Reinbeau

    Reinbeau The Teapot Underground Premium Member

    Quote:There are so many! I'm sending you an e-mail with a document I've developed that we hand out at our club's bee school - that starts tonight, actually, so I've just updated it.

    My Organic garden is a good distance from my chooks and I always grow a lot of flowers to attract bees already and this just seems like the next logical step.

    It's the perfect next step [​IMG]

    I dont need a lot maybe 1 or 2 boxes is this a bad idea? I will read up on it of course and not just jump into it but this is my beginning stage. [​IMG]

    It's nice to start out with two, that's what we did - we're up to 14 now in three locations.

    My biggest concern is getting stung, is that something that happens a lot? will they sting me as I tend to my garden, or should I put them away from the veggies and just make a flower bed for them? Before I do anything I want to decide on an area first. [​IMG] I know that is probably a silly question but I disturbed some bees last year that were pollinating a bush by my fence gate and when I opened the gate I was divebombed and stung 6 times in the neck and head before I was able to run squeeling like a pig. [​IMG]

    Honeybees do not want to sting you, they die when they do. If you move methodically when working them, and wear a good bee suit or other appropriate clothing, it shouldn't be a problem. Eventually you will know when you can work them barehanded and when you should be fully armored [​IMG] Always, always, always, however, wear a good hat and veil.

    Do bees take up a lot of time? I am already stretched pretty thin but if it is similar to raising meal worms (in time that is) then I could manage it [​IMG]

    When you're getting the packages started is probably the most time you'll spend, and even that isn't that much, a few hours for a few weeks. Harvesting takes the most time once you're established.

    Good luck and any questions just fire away! If anyone else wants a copy of the file, just let me know [​IMG]
     
  5. AHappychick

    AHappychick Wanna-be Farmer

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    oh thanks for the info. I am going to read all about it and go from there. Is there any source for used equipment? I am going to start searching Craigslist now and hope to find some stuff as I have a VERY small budget, might even sell a few chooks to pay for the bee thing. [​IMG]

    Thanks again!

    ohhhh so exciting [​IMG]
     
  6. schmism

    schmism Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i keep bees, going into my second year.

    a few quick notes

    1) dont expect honey the first year. shure if there is a great spring necture flow (which the bees turn into honey) then you could take a little, but by far they will use most of it building out the wax honeycomb from the flat foundation you give them to start. it takes the bees about 10lbs of honey to produce 1 lb wax.

    2) some wooden ware items can be found on craigslist, but even in my busy CL location of St Louis, i still only see one maybee 2 listings a year for bee stuff.

    sites that you should become fimilar with.

    the bee forums
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/index.php

    and a couple of the major mail order bee equipment places
    Dadent
    http://www.dadant.com/catalog/
    walter T kelly
    https://products.kelleybees.com/wtkprod/

    there are others but ive used both those.
     
  7. ijon1

    ijon1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I got a hive in a tree I was cuting about two weeks ago. I felt sorry for them and took the log home. I put a rubber made tub on top of the log. There is a small air hole under the tub. Will they need extra food between now and spring?
     
  8. Nava

    Nava I Got The Naked Neck Blues

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    $120 per family hive is that a good price,somebody's selling in craigslist.
     
  9. babettenj

    babettenj Out Of The Brooder

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    google"beekeepers journal christopher teasdale" it will take you to a new jersey beekeepers journal as he cronicles his beekeeping experiences through the seasons in the NYT. it's good reading. i heard on the news today that the NY times is gonna start charging for articles. it had to happen sooner or later.
     
  10. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    We want to do it too... I'll be watching this thread.
     

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