IB Split to white? Pic included

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by blondie34, Mar 2, 2016.

  1. blondie34

    blondie34 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi everyone! My knowledge of peafowl genetics is very elementary..

    The breeder I got my boys from told me that there was a chance they may be split to white. I've read that birds with white feathers in their flights and/or white throat patches are indicative of them being split to white.. I suspect one of my peacocks is.. the one on the right.. he has two, maybe three white flights and a very small white patch on his throat.

    Tell me what you think.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. barkerg

    barkerg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Agreed, aka dark pied, will make pretty peababies with the right hens. Ps: the one in the back looks to be a black shoulder variety. Gerald Barker
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2016
  3. blondie34

    blondie34 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When you say "with the right hens" what do you mean? I have two IB hens and an IB BS hen.. I'm hoping to get a white and a pied hen this summer as well.
     
  4. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    When you breed your Dark Pied with a hen that also carries a white gene you will get a percentage of chicks that may be white, pied, or even white eyed. It just depends on the ancestors. A lot of the chicks will show no white at all and some will.
     
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  5. barkerg

    barkerg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Put a pied or white hen under him.

    Gerald Barker
     
  6. Birdrain92

    Birdrain92 Overrun With Chickens

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    If that male is carrying the White gene, with a Pied hen you can get IB split to White, IB split to Pied, Whites or Pieds. I could have messed up my genetics a little bit but this sounds right to me for now. If he's carrying the White gene and is placed with a White you will get IB split to White and White. If it's the Pied gene he carries and you breed him to a Pied you will get Pied and I can't remember what happens if you have two Pied genes. With a White hen it's the same as the White gene with a Pied hen.
     
  7. Midnightman14

    Midnightman14 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    you have two dark pied males one of which is also a blackshoulder, If they are bred to anything but whites, loud pieds, silver pieds, or other dark pieds you won't get any white or pied birds as pieds require one copy of the white gene and one copy of the pied gene. Dark pieds are missing half of the gene equation so they don't have alot of white feathers.
     
  8. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My neighbor's birds -- which have about that much white, one even less -- hatched a white chick. It's impossible to tell whether the bird is split white or split pied when there's just a few white flights and a white throat latch. If the breeder is suggesting the birds are split white, the breeder may have more information than we do here (which we are basing on one photo).

    With that said, breeding to a white bird will eventually tell you whether the birds are split white or split pied -- if they are split white, you will get some white chicks and more split whites, if they are split pied, you will get some pied (from the pied/white combination), some split whites and split pieds, and you may not be able to tell the last two apart!

    If the birds are split pied (as opposed to split white), they will NOT produce white chicks when bred to white birds. It takes two white genes to make white chicks, one from each parent.

    Two split white birds (as in the case of my neighbor) can make white chicks. Two split pied, or one split pied plus one split white cannot make white chicks, they can only make pied chicks. The two split white birds can also produce birds with no white splits and more white splits. The split pieds can also make birds with no pied genes at all, as can happen with the split white, split pied breeding, or more splits of pied. The pieds from two split pied birds will likely be dark as it takes a white gene plus a pied gene to get a strongly pied-looking bird. Pied to Pied (each parent carrying one white plus one pied) can give whites, more pieds, and dark pieds.
     
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  9. Zohaib

    Zohaib Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a black shoulder Peacock with no white patch either on throat or flight have 3 indian blue peahens with him, he gave 7 pure white' 2 pied' 4 black shoulder and 11Indian blue chicks this season. He carries white genes and giving 4 types of peachicks with Indian blue hens.
     
  10. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your hens must also be split. To get pure white chicks from a split white bird, the hen must also be split white. (That's like my neighbor's birds...) One of the peahens must be split black shoulder, otherwise you would not get BS chicks. (Sometimes a split BS will show some change in the shoulder pattern, but not a full black shoulder.) To get the pied chicks, one of the hens (not the one that is split white) must be carrying at least one pied gene. (If it were the same hen that is carrying the white gene, she would be visibly pied if she also had a pied gene.)

    All 11 of the IB chicks will be carrying a BS gene from their father -- as will all the chicks he sires, including the whites and pieds. You will not see it visibly on any of those birds, but if they are bred back to a black shoulder or to a split black shoulder, some of the chicks will be black shoulder. Expect about half black shoulder chicks if you breed any of them to a black shoulder mate, and about 1/4 if you breed to a split. Half of the others (from the breeding of the two splits) will be split to black shoulder themselves.

    If you can figure out which hen gave you the white chicks, and which hen gave you the pied chicks, you will know which hen has the white gene versus which one has the pied gene. I am assuming you mean the pied chicks have significant white on them, rather than just a few white flights and/or a white throat latch. If they only have one or a few white flights and/or a white throat latch, they could just be split whites and not carrying a pied gene at all.

    Was this too confusing? Sorry. We can draw Punnet squares if you like. But the point is, the hens (at least some of them) must be carrying some hidden genes also, otherwise he could not produce the white chicks or the black shoulder chicks.

    Congratulations on a great hatch from him!
     
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