I'd love to hear about your house chickens!

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by birdly, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. birdly

    birdly In the Brooder

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    May 31, 2012
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    Hello! I'm new here.

    I've wanted hens as pets for many years, but it just hasn't happened yet. Because of a disability, I'm home most of the time, and not able to be as active as I used to be.

    Recently, I've been thinking of getting a Faverolle pullet, because I've read that they are docile and "loners". I have a petite senior cat, a sweet little lady that I adopted 11 years ago. I'm somewhat concerned that she might see small hens as prey (silkies, for example), or that larger hens might boss and peck her. I'd love to hear your experiences and ideas about house chickens.

    I'm not really concerned about egg production, I just really enjoy chicken company.

    Thanks! I'm looking forward to learning.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  2. christineavatar

    christineavatar Songster

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    I think that one chicken will be hard on the bird. You should have at least two (or three in case one dies). And I would have their cage somewhere that gets fresh air because the chickens smell like chickens.
     
  3. firedancer57

    firedancer57 Songster

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    Hello,
    have had a house chick for 2+ years. She is a Barred Rock, and spoiled rotten. The adventure of having a house chicken is not for everyone and I really advise you to think hard and long on it. Z was a rescue, as our family has had parrots and conures for many years it was just natural to take in this little ball of black and yellow fluff. Z is the ruler of the flock here she, bullies the dogs (rot cross and an akita cross) our Blue and Gold Macaw and just last week she went after my Umbrella Cockatoo.
    Z was very loving until just recently, she went through a very hard molt, didn't lay for almost two months and her personality changed, other then that she has been , like I said, an adventure.
    I wish you luck, and I know that if you have any questions the people hear are very knowledgeable and willing to help.

    Good luck,
    Ann
     
  4. birdly

    birdly In the Brooder

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    Thank you, christineavatar and Firedancer57. I appreciate your sharing your thoughts.
     
  5. MamaMarcy

    MamaMarcy Songster

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    I have chickens & ducks (and one obese turkey) in our yard...and saved a baby chick that halfway hatched & got stuck and mama hen tried to eat her. Dottie is 2 days old now and currently nested in my HAIR. [​IMG] she's a bantam cochin. My husband is very distressed that Dottie is spending time in my bra, and now my hair. I know she'll need to move outside eventually but right now she's where she needs to be. [​IMG] (I'm housebound right now after major ankle surgery and won't be back on my feet till sometime next month). If I were single with no cats Dottie would just stay inside with me.
     
  6. birdly

    birdly In the Brooder

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    MamaMarcy, that is so sweet. What a comfort for both of you as she recovers from hatching and you recover from your ankle surgery. I hope you heal quickly and completely. I'd love to hear updates about Dottie as she grows. Do you have a photo of her?
     
  7. peepacheep

    peepacheep Songster

    I have brought indoors injured or molting hens, ones that decided to drop all of their feathers during weeks of winter freezing fog and rain. As grateful as I am for all the eggs they have given us and as happy as I am to help them when they need a little extra help. I am always glad when they are able to go back out to their coop. An adult molting hen gives a whole other meaning to feather duster. Amazing the amount of dander that will come off of one hen. A bonded spayed/neutered pair of molting rabbits generates far less mess. Bonus? Rabbits, while not perfect, are for the most part litter box trainable. ( they are however a life support system for gnawing teeth [​IMG], bunny proofing is both art and science) Had one re-cooperating hen that would rush outdoors first thing in the morning to relieve herself but all bets where off for the rest of the day. This chicken totally ruled the house rabbits, struck terror in 3 cats and humbled the 3 Labradors. If she wanted the dog bed or dog crate the 70 pound bird dogs got out of her way. While I thoroughly enjoy spending time hanging out with the hens outdoors the mess they make indoors can be overwhelming.
     
  8. SmallFarmChick

    SmallFarmChick Chirping

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    Apr 9, 2012
    in the coop
    I have a friend who had a chicken who she brought inside all the time. She painted her nails, gave her baths, played with her, and loved inside time.
    I have no experience with indoor chickens, but I would think they would need a good indoor setting
    and plenty of outside time. My friend has cats and chickens and they never harm each other. I would get a large breed though. I would buy a chicken diaper for play time in the house
    and NEVER let her roam in the house by herself. She would need a little spot for her to stay in at night and rest in. She will need PLENTY of outdoor time as well. Other wise I think it's a great idea!!!!
     
  9. jenni2142

    jenni2142 Songster

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    I have a sebright inside for the past 2 years. She stays in a rabbit cage at night and roams the house most of the day while someone is home. She is an unusual chicken in that she HATES chickens. She was part of a trio at one time but since they died she will not accept another bird. She likes tv and snuggling on the couch. She rules my bunnies with an iron beak, stealing their food and sharing their water. Cleaning her cage is easier that cleaning a litterbox. I have had 2 different house chickens, both tiny bantams. There really is no smell to speak of when they are that small. It really does depend on the personality of the bird as to whether or not they would be lonely.
     
  10. birdly

    birdly In the Brooder

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    May 31, 2012
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    I'm really enjoying reading everyone's experiences and thoughts. Thank you!
     

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