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Ideal's Cornish Rocks vs Cornish X

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Ariana, Feb 1, 2014.

  1. Ariana

    Ariana Out Of The Brooder

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    Has anyone raised both of these? Are the CR comparable to the CX? When I called Ideal, they said the growth rate was "about the same" but does anyone here have any first-hand experience?
     
  2. enel 1

    enel 1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They are same. There are many, many threads on here in the meat bird section. There are only two companies that produce commercial broilers that hatcheries dub as CX,Cornish cross, rock cross, Cornish Rock cross, etc. I started a thread call " When will they stop calling them Cornish cross " they are actually a 4 way hybrid that requires two seperat sets of parental lines, which of course the two giant corporations own the genetics and are not available to you and I. Get comfy and go through the meat bird thread and I promise all your questions will be answered. Good reading
    By the companys that produce these birds are, Cobb/ Ross and Hubbard, there is a lot of info on there web sites also: growth rates and what not.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2014
  3. Ariana

    Ariana Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you very much!
     
  4. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

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    There are three that produce broiler strains, Cobb-Vantress, Aviagen, and Hendrix Genetics. And they may not be the same - there is a chance that they could be doing some old style crosses to produce their meat birds.I know that there are still a few independently owned broiler lines in the united states.

    And people call it a cornish cross because of it's roots - it's easier for many people to call it a cornish cross than the strain name (and let's face it they would get the strains mixed up and everything)
     
  5. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Cornish cross is another name for COrnish ROck. Don't get too struck on the sematics. Just know these are the white broiler birds that grow very fast and look like the poultry at the supermarket.
     
  6. enel 1

    enel 1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Correct!!
     
  7. enel 1

    enel 1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh boy, not this old debate...I'm out
     
  8. enel 1

    enel 1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On second thought, call ducks, since it seems your following me around disputing my posts, aviagen is a Cobb/ vantress company, and I don't know that the " independent " breeders supplies hatcheries with eggs any where near the amount that Cobb or Hubbard does, so most likely you'll be getting one of their birds, and as far as commercial broilers go...Cornish may have been in there lineage, but that was long ago and the companies that produce these birds don't even call them Cornish cross,CX, or what ever. They call them BROILERS.there is red breasted Malay in the lineage of Rhode island reds, but we don't call them Malay cross. Cornish cross is a marketing name givine to the bird by the grocery industry, and the hatcheries use that term to sell chick to the public. Now I'm out! Lol
     
  9. Paul Ewing

    Paul Ewing Out Of The Brooder

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    But what most people process are not broilers, they are most likely roasters (3.5 lbs+) with a few doing fryers (2.5-3.5 lbs). A broiler is under 2.5 pounds which is about what a 6-8 week old heritage breed would have done.
     
  10. Paul Ewing

    Paul Ewing Out Of The Brooder

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    BTW: In answer to the original poster's question, I was not happy with the strain of Big White Fast Growing Double Breasted Chickens (BWFGDBCs) that Ideal was sending out a couple years ago compared to the strains of BWFGDBCs that I got from Welp and Meyer.

    I took a year off from meat birds last year, but will be getting my first batch of 250 at the end of the month from a new source that is also handling my USDA processing this year. They are an older Cobb strain, but I don't remember the exact one.

    In our marketing we will call them Cornish Cross broilers even though it is not really accurate, because that is what the more foodie/nutritionally researched customers are used to hearing as a description. Plus BWFGDBC is way too much of a mouthful.
     

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