Ideas how to make this into a brooder? (Pictures added)

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by marlene, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. marlene

    marlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]So I found this on the roadside for free. Thought that I might be able to make a brooder out of it. (Got chicks hatching in 2 and 3 weeks)
    The width is perfect but it's not deep enough. My thoughts are to take the doors of, and add wood to the sides and extend the depth level with the existing, then re attach the doors to the extension part, but replace the glass with small wire for extra light and ventilation.
    Any other ideas or feedback welcome.
    Ps it measures 38 inches wide, 26 inches high and 12 inches deep.
    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2016
  2. tmarsh83

    tmarsh83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it's me, I take it off the legs, lay it on its back, remove the glass and replace it with hardware cloth.

    Easier than adding depth.
     
  3. marlene

    marlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They legs are part of the unit sides, they would have to be sawn off, which I don't really to do as I like the idea of not having to bend right down. Would the unit not be too cramped hight wise if layer down? I like the idea of giving them plenty of room.
    If it was I that had to build the extension, I might be tempted to lay it flat and use it that way, but luckily I have 2 carpenters in the house and the wood lol.
    Thank you for your suggestion.
     
  4. tmarsh83

    tmarsh83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Depends how long you plan to brood them in there I suppose. Hinged doors as a top are nice because they don't have to open all the way to add food and water so they can't escape.
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    How many chicks? How long do you intend to brood them? What will you use for heat source? When I brood chicks, I like to have 2 s.f./chick to get them through the entire "need heat" phase. While this little cabinet is cute, my initial reaction is this: If you are having 2 broods hatch, and if your hatch is successful, you will have way too many chicks to even hold them for a week in that cabinet, even if you add a LONG extension to the back. Do you have your coop built yet? How bout brooding them right in the coop. That solves a lot of potential head aches, not to mention: lack of space, the dander, dust and smell of having chicks in the house. It gives them plenty of room so that they avoid the disaster of getting over heated. It saves the hassle of chicks going into panic mode when they DO get moved to the coop. And, if you use a heating pad to brood your chicks, you will reap the benefit of chicks that are more socially well adjusted, feather faster, and they reap the benefits of natural day/night cycles instead of living under the 24/7 inquisition style heat lamp.
     
  6. marlene

    marlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I will have 7 max but possibly less, depends on how many hatch.
    I would like to brood them in there for about 6 weeks, then I have a larger pen with an attached run. Once they are about the size of my other pullets, I will integrate them into the main coop and run.
    I have a brinsea chick brooder for the heat source.
    They will not be in the house, so dust is not an issue.
    Their brooder will be within a very large wooden play house that is outside in the garden, it has windows and a barn style door, so they will get plenty of fresh air. I also plan to supervise them in the garden daily, slowly building the time they spend outside as they grow and feather out.
     
  7. HorseFeathees

    HorseFeathees New Egg

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    Hi
    I am doing the same thing.I have a 50 gallon wide aquarium I have a 100 watt light and a glass top with a digital thermometer and two heating pads under the aquarium with one turner. I can't seem to get it hot enough to hatch my two eggs. it syays at an even 84. Help apprearicated . I have no moniter to turn it off and on so keep a close eye on it. I do have an Inkbird and have tried to use it but it will not set a tempeture orhold the tempeture .
     
  8. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    That's pretty small. You can brood for a few weeks, but not to 6 weeks.

    I feel I'm missing something.....you have a heat plate as a heat source, correct? And a playhouse structure? Why another brooder, why not just use the playhouse and the heat plate?
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. marlene

    marlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You are correct, it is a brinsea heat plate as such that can be used for upto 20 chicks. Didn't want to risk using a heat lamp in that wooden structure.
    I will not use the play house as the main brooder as it is a very large playhouse. It is probably 12x12 foot, with an upstairs level also. I would rather use something that will keep the chicks more contained within their own space.
    What is the recommended space for chicks up to about 6 weeks of age?
     
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    You need to have the temp within the optimal range to hatch eggs. If you run the temp too low or too high, while you get some development, the organ systems will not develop adequately, resulting in huge birth defects or early death. I would suggest that you get some one to help you with the inkbird. It can be tricky to wire in, and can also be tricky to adjust. The instructions that come with them are IMO pathetic.
     

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