Identification of weed in garden

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by veggietreeigrl, Jan 24, 2014.

  1. veggietreeigrl

    veggietreeigrl Out Of The Brooder

    63
    2
    38
    Jan 13, 2014
    Southern California
    Found this little thing growing in my garden. Can anyone tell me what it is? Please and thanks.

    [​IMG]

    Underside of the leaves:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,726
    70
    191
    Apr 21, 2012
    North Texas
    -looks a bit like black nightshade.
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

    20,978
    10,491
    636
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    What we call pig weed in this neck of the woods.
     
  4. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

    4,011
    2,675
    341
    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    Really looks like lambs quarters to me. When young the leaves have a lemony taste to me.

    http://www.ediblewildfood.com/lambs-quarters.aspx
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

    20,978
    10,491
    636
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    I think lambs quarters and pig weed are the same thing.
     
  6. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

    4,011
    2,675
    341
    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    From my research, pig weed is a poisonous plant and there are also several different plants that are referred to as pig weed. The red root of pig weed readily distinguishes it from lambs quarters which is an edible weed.

    http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/poison/plants/pppigwe.htm
     
  7. veggietreeigrl

    veggietreeigrl Out Of The Brooder

    63
    2
    38
    Jan 13, 2014
    Southern California
    Whatever it was, I pulled it and tossed it just to be safe. Thanks all. :)
     
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

    20,978
    10,491
    636
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    If it is Lambs Quarters (alias pig weed) it's supposed to be a very tasty salad green and chicken fodder. Would make a nice substitute for spinach. It sets seeds just like spinach does.
     
  9. Euarto Gullible

    Euarto Gullible Chillin' With My Peeps

    295
    52
    146
    Apr 14, 2013
    Pueblo, CO``
    Common lambsquarters are Chenopodium album. In some regions people call them pigweed, but it's sort of a misnomer. All true pigweeds are from the genus Amaranthus (wild amaranths). They look somewhat similar. Both plants are edible for humans. Just make sure to use pigweed less than a foot tall, and boil them first as they're high in oxalates. I have noticed that chickens will eagerly eat the young pigweed seedlings, but are much less eager to eat mature plants, whereas they'll happily pick a giant lambsquarters bush clean. I eat plenty of both of these plants, and so do my chickens. Young lambsquarters leaves are good in a fresh salad. They are my chickens' favorite weeds, along with purslane.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2014
    2 people like this.
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

    20,978
    10,491
    636
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    Thanks so much for the education. The plant I'm familiar with is lambs quarters, however, I grew up calling it pig weed. I have been edified! I have yet to try eating it. will have to try it this spring. That's on my bucket list: to learn to identify all of the native wild edibles and add them to my dinner plate. Ever tried fresh cat-nine-tail shoots? They taste a bit like cucumber.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by