If a egg if unfertilized and incubated can you give it to livestock?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by phantomml, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. phantomml

    phantomml Out Of The Brooder

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    May 4, 2011
    New Waterford
    If I candle an egg and there it no vien and cracking it open reveals it wasn't fertilized, can you cook the egg and give it to your geese and ducks?
     
  2. saddina

    saddina Internally Deranged

    May 2, 2009
    Desert, CA
    I wouldn't risk it.
     
  3. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    how long was it incubated?

    if just for a day or two you could (no different than it sitting out on my counter here in texas during a heat wave).. if it's been more than a few days i would toss it.. the egg would have started to degrade and bacteria would have started growing..

    i know some people will still throw them out raw to their pigs... but i have found older eggs tend to give my dogs gas (I don't have pigs).. and trust me.. it's no fun when you have 8 dogs with gas at the same time!
     
  4. HenCrazyMom

    HenCrazyMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 17, 2011
    Merrifield, MN
    Quote:
    [​IMG]:lau

    The thought of 8 dogs with gas at the same time makes me laugh!
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Whether the egg was fertilized or not has nothing to do with bacteria growing in it. The bloom and egg shell are the same on all of them and work to keep bacteria out. Even if an egg is fertilized and is developing, it can still be contaminated with bacteria.

    I'd do the sniff test. If it smells OK, it is probably OK. If it has started to smell, I'd toss it.
     
  6. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:
    [​IMG]:lau

    The thought of 8 dogs with gas at the same time makes me laugh!

    oh.. you wouldn't be laughing if you had been there.. trust me! [​IMG]
     
  7. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Just to clarify... I said:
    "how long was it incubated?

    if just for a day or two you could (no different than it sitting out on my counter here in texas during a heat wave).. if it's been more than a few days i would toss it.. the egg would have started to degrade and bacteria would have started growing.. "

    ..so I never mentioned fertilization being a factor one way or the other.. i was referring to HEAT from incubation
     
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    Quote:Just to clarify... I said:
    "how long was it incubated?

    if just for a day or two you could (no different than it sitting out on my counter here in texas during a heat wave).. if it's been more than a few days i would toss it.. the egg would have started to degrade and bacteria would have started growing.. "

    ..so I never mentioned fertilization being a factor one way or the other.. i was referring to HEAT from incubation

    And I was referring to bacteria being present. If bacteria is not present, the egg will not go bad. If bacteria is present, the egg will go bad a lot quicker at incubation temperatures tha it would in a refrigerator or on a counter in an air conditioned house, fertile or not. I'm not arguing that.

    The OP's original question mentioned it being fertilized. That is what I was responding to.
     
  9. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 4, 2010
    Glasgow, Scotland
    My dogs tend to be old fartbags anyway, so I'll happily feed them undeveloped eggs that have been incubating for as long as two weeks. As long as when I crack them open they just smell like warm raw eggs. If they ever smelled of anything else I wouldn't risk it. Occasionally my dogs turn them down, and I guess with their uber-sensitive schnozzles, those times maybe they can smell something bad that I can't...
     

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