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if Medal sheds are ok, what about plastic shed used for chicken coop ?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by MamaChic21, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. MamaChic21

    MamaChic21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't want to impose on the other thread by asking my own questions.

    I have 7x7 plastic shed that is a house for my chickens and ducks. I've put some roosting bars and nesting area and 2 heated lights. As for ventilation, the double doors can't be closed shut. My hubby isn't the greatest handyman [​IMG] I closed one door and left the other door cracked open alittle bit so the can come in and out. I'm currently in the battle with myself in finding a new location and possibly a new coop/run. It will save me a lot of money if I use my existing plastic shed but since winter in NJ is cold and icy, can the chickens still be warm ?d I also have a small coop and a medium coop at the same location. I have 3 ducks, 21 chickens and 1 baby chic. (baby chic and her mommy is in the garage's broody home for now)
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Plastic sheds work ok as long as they are sturdily enough put together to resist a strong determined raccoon or coyote (people always underestimate how STRONG these things can be when they know there is KFC-on-the-hoof inside...)

    You will have to add a fair bit of additional ventilation though. "the doors don't close right" is not enough, and will probably have to be fixed anyhow because it tends to be a weakness wehre predators can get ahold and pry things open/apart.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  3. MamaChic21

    MamaChic21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 2, 2010
    Jackson, NJ
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Weasels, which are in NJ and most likely in your area (nobody ever knows they've got 'em around til you find headless chickens one morning when your luck runs out), will go right thru chainlink like it isn't even there.

    It looks to me like a raccoon or possum could pretty easily get in thru the top, too, although if there is actual chainlink or *very* firmly attached 2x4 wire up there that I'm not seeing then maybe not.

    I am not criticizing, just trying to provide a reality check. Having not had problems yet is NOT at all the same thing as "predatorproof".

    Anyhow, regarding making the shed portable, sure, if you put it on a low sturdy platform with wheels and devise some means to anchor it against blowing over, that should work and it should not be too difficult to make it so you can pull it without a vehicle. Rather than replacing a door with plywood I would suggest trying to put a window in the existing plastic door, which would be not much if any less secure than a thin plywood door and will be lighter weight (thus contribute to making the structure easier to pull).

    Plastic is fine for the winter as long as you add sufficient ventilation.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  5. MamaChic21

    MamaChic21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    that pic was when we were first trying to put everything together. I don't have the lasted picture yet. We put out gutters, and chicken wires for the areas that is slightly open. Painted the fence and the coop. We put plastic roof tops at the side of the run, so it can eliminate the wind and possibly some rain and snow. By all means, I am not offended at all. If anything, I am glad your pointing stuffs out because maybe I could have overlooked or forgotten about it.

    My dream coop/run is to have a big dog kennel. They have shingeld roof with housing inside and a platform so it won't be muddy and chicks feet won't get cold atleast with hay and/or wood chips on thop of the platform and easy to clean and aside from that is to have a second run attached to the dog kennel but the roof to be all fenced in so they can get direct sunligh and the floors will be grass and dirt. Here's the type of dog kennel I'm talking about http://www.cedargroveproducts.com/products/kennels_and_chicken_coops/kennels/ and no wheels [​IMG] what wheel can carry this ?
     
  6. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    I have those plastic vinyl sheds and they are great. It is now seven years old!

    [​IMG]

    I do agree with cutting out a panel in the door to make it light and air accessible. Be sure to put hardware wire over them.

    The shed is about ten to twenty degree warmer than outside and it never gave me any problems when I solved the vent problems and installing a screened window next to the roosting bars.

    My run is NOT predator proof by sewer rats however coons and possums got tangled up in the green snow fence on top so it has to be replaced when torn. If you have real problem with predators, reinforce it with wire panels or install electric fencing top and bottom. The coop itself is predator proof so they get locked up every night but I dont always lock them up ALL the time. Lucky me, I've got neighbors who has dogs all around me so only the bold and brave coons would even try to cross the yards to access my run. Squirrels and wild birds are my main complaint.
     
  7. MamaChic21

    MamaChic21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    squirrels hate dogs, if you had one, they won't dare to come in to your backyard [​IMG] Overall, you did a great job. You also have nice corner spot and flat land for them. I really like it, nice job [​IMG] I think plastic sheds or coops are better in one area, it won't be worn out like wood does over time and they can weight less then woods too.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2010
  8. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    They do get worn out, the wood foundation floor which it helped by horse rubber stall mats but the exposure from ground even it was up on landscape blocks, the sewer rats made their home underneath it and they gnawed some holes. So we replaced it a few months ago, propped the new foundation upon foundation bricks much higher ON top of the landscape blocks, it made a world of difference and no rats or mice would reside under there.

    The hardware wire door would need to be replaced soon, probably next spring because it is only one by one, treated, held up well but after the ice rain we had, it weaken the one corner of it. Seven years is a long time. This time, we are going to take the door it came with the shed, cut a hole in it to accept a small storm screen window and have hardware wire so any determined dog won't think about jumping up on the screened part. I love this door because it provides plenty of vents and very comfortable in the summer months.

    My six year old dd wants a dog but we do not want a dog because we are selfish, going all the time, and not be tied down to the dog we are not ready for would not be fair to the dog either. We used to have collies and Borzois and they are sweet dogs. We might get one later once we get out of Civil War reenactments or retired LOL! My hubby is a dog, every time he sees one in the backyard or front, he would bark like a yapper dog LOL! Poor squirrels will hightail it to the nearest tree!
     
  9. MamaChic21

    MamaChic21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:[​IMG] [​IMG] thank you for making my day [​IMG]

    We found 1 small mice underneath the plastic shed last fall, it was disgusting [​IMG]. If I was to use this shed somewhere else as their permanet home, I was thinking of putting 12x12 in of stones underneath the shed so they can't hide or try to get in from the bottom of the shed atleast !
     
  10. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Here is the foundation blocks being placed on the existing patio blocks.
    [​IMG]

    Installing the doggie door at nighttime LOL! We could not find any horse rubber mats of certain size in a quick hurry that day, so we had to improvise by using a rubber truck mat bed...works like a charm! It is a little harder rubber than the horse rubber mat so it will stand up to metal gouging of my shovels when I do my cleaning.
    [​IMG]

    I love my shed, no worries about water rot, just pull all the stuff out, then wash it down with soap, bleach and dust it when it dries. Take a soft broom to scrub the screens clean or power wash all of it.

    One thing I would have changed is this.....wished I would have bought a six by six shed instead of a four by seven shed. It is made by Royal Outdoor Shed, out of Canada....I think it is now located in Ohio when this USA shed bought it out.

    I am afraid Royal Outdoor Sheds will not be around too much longer in that size. It would be the 8 x 8 sheds and bigger will be all they will offer in the USA. I've tried to buy the Yardmate 6 x 6 but they no longer make it. However my next door neighbor has one so if and when they decide to get a bigger shed, I will see if I can buy it from them! [​IMG] you can see the glimpse of their shed in front of the red car across the street.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2010

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