if my chicks have parasites, does that mean i'm doing a poor job of managing their environment?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by bj taylor, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. bj taylor

    bj taylor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    one chick scratched herself bloody today. i couldn't see any reason. i watched them for awhile tonight & 'maybe' they are scratching rather than grooming. the one seems miserable. tomorrow i'm going to get de & dust the coop & seven dust & dust the chick.
    should i have done something else to have prevented this? and should i be doing something now other than what i mentioned above?
    thanks for your input.
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Chicks scratch and groom a lot, and this could just be an accident. If they are indoors it would be odd for them to have mites / lice, unless maybe you also have an outdoor flock that has them, and you somehow carried them in. If there are lice / mites, you will be able to see them.

    How many chicks? How big is your brooder? How much air exchange does it have? What is the bedding? How old are they? What is the temp in the brooder?

    http://ucanr.org/freepubs/docs/8162.pdf
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    If management related cause suspected, then also look at brooder design. Does it have any sharp projections or holes chicks may get hung on, especially when startled. Also what chicks being fed? Sometimes they will engage in cannibalism when is feed not balanced or adequate with respect to nutrients provided.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012
  4. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    It's hard to say if your management practices caused parasites without knowing what those practices and conditions are. All can get them no matter the practices but it's not usual to see them on chicks.
     

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