if you have genetic questions

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by redrooster99, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. redrooster99

    redrooster99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    georgia
    post your questions
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2013
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Autosomal red is autosomal--NOT sex-linked
    Dominant white is I, and it is also an autosomal gene
    Recessive white is c, and it, too is autosomal.

    Geese and chickens do not share the same gene set.

    Dominant white can and often does leak colour; particularly red/gold (as in red pyle)
    Recessive white rarely shows a feather or two of colour; never more than that, and in my personal experience, only black pigment has been leaked.

    On re-reading and paying more attention, there are a lot of errors: birchen and brown red are identical except that brown red is a bird with gold ground whereas birchen has silver ground. Dun and choc are different genes that have a similar appearance. Self-blue is lavender, which is an entirely different gene than blue. Neither ducks nor turkeys share the same genes as chickens. ETC.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Chicks Galore3

    Chicks Galore3 Artistic Bird Nut

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    Mind boggling but interesting!
     
  4. redrooster99

    redrooster99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    georgia
    i didnt right this so i dont now
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    ok; what is your source? Generally folks list a credit for things they copy; that way there is a context behind what is written, as well as credit to the actual author. For example, Something written by a scientist or historian many years ago does not have knowledge and information that is of more recent origin.
     
  6. redrooster99

    redrooster99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    georgia
  7. draye

    draye Overrun With Chickens

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    Awesome, but really needs the credits behind it.
     
  8. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    My Coop
    Hi,
    This is wrong:
    Columbian:
    Genetic Code: eb/eb S/S Co/Co = Columbian
    Breed Examples: Light Sussex

    Light Sussex are eWh/eWh S/S Co/Co . There are so many breed varieties based on eb/eb that use Columbian gene, people just lump the Light Sussex variety in there too. There are only 2 poultry varieties I know of which have the same genotype as Light Sussex. The Japanese bantam and the Columbian Marans . The Columbian Marans in the USA was founded on a cross to a Light Sussex. The Co gene is bred differently on either the eb or eWh locus. It also manifests differently. In eb, the birds can have black stippling on back and saddle if the depth of hue in the underfluff is improperly managed....not the correct balance to the top color to create the white body color in the top plumage. In eWh, the underfluff is white to the skin. No color balancing necessary no blacks tippling in body or saddle..unless the black in the hackle and tail is too much and then black stippling can appear on the body. But that is different from the misbalancing of the hue in the underfluff in eb/eb based Columbian varieties.
    This is one reason the Light Sussex are such a fine fowl for beginners in fancy fowl.
    Best,
    Karen
    Light Sussex
    in western PA. USA
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  9. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    so many wrong things posted on that paper
     
  10. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    no one with basic genetics of chickens would have publish that.


    Edited by Staff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 26, 2013

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