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I'm out of eggs!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by tealeaf33, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. tealeaf33

    tealeaf33 New Egg

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    P lease help! I have 12 hens and one rooster, and about three weeks ago, the girls decided to stop laying eggs! What can I do to get them going again? They are about 3years old and I have several different breeds. Any suggestions?
     
  2. loveourbirds

    loveourbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    there are a few things that can cause this, are they in a molt? is your temperature dropping below freezing? have you changed feeds, or has they changed the way your feed is made? has there been any things causing stress? is it possible they have moved nests and are hiding eggs from you, or could anything be stealing the eggs? do you have any kind of parasite infection - mites, lice or worms?
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    All that^^^.... and shortening days.....do you use supplemental light?
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    It's the normal time of year for older birds to take a break. You can try using supplemental light to force them to continue laying, or just let them take a break. They'll start back up in the spring.
     
  5. aayto1

    aayto1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Try them on some straight cracked corn in cooler months as this is considered a hot food with lots of protein which is needed to produce an egg. There are foods that are hot and cold to chickens. Protein high foods are HOT food for chickens and will keep them going in cooler months till spring comes around. I had the same problem and could never work it out but once I fed them cracked corn they layed all through Winter. Hope this helps.
     
  6. CAjerseychick

    CAjerseychick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sadly, your situation sounds like mine, exactly cept mine are only barely 2 years old....
    I feed Gamebird starter, way hotter than cracked corn at 22% protein (their molt seemed heavy, its freezing, and we have had to dramatically change their feeding oportunities d/t getting goats who eat all their feed whenever they can get it)....
    I would say Gamebird starter is a really Hot feed but a little pricey at $20 a 50# bag... but we love our birds (10 hens, 3 young pullets- June hatch--, and 1 Roo)
     
  7. loveourbirds

    loveourbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    mix gamebird starter with 35-40 lbs cracked corn will put your protein at about 16 percent (depending on corn). if your feeding commercial GMO corn like the rest of us, and not free ranging, the corn just doesnt have enough protein/ nutrition.

    i use a mix of whole and cracked grains, with some range bird pellets and some molasses. range bird pellets are similar to 24% hog pellets. its not corn/soy GMO free, but i have good luck with it and Ohio's winters.
     
  8. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I thought corn was only like 8% protein? It's just a starch/carb, not a protein.
     
  9. loveourbirds

    loveourbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    im not sure what Australia is growing, and how they grow it - but corn's protein was about 4% higher in the US around 25 years ago. their protein may be higher.

    i started to say the same thing, but i started researching a little and they are a little more strict on GMO's than we are.

    even if it is 12% they would need an additional source of protein- bugs or meat products.
     
  10. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you want to have eggs all through the year, I suggest replacing a few older hens each year with a few pullets. Get a few chicks in the spring and when those pullets start laying you can sell, give away, or butcher a few older hens. If you have the room and want to feed the older hens you can just keep them. This way you will be getting eggs when older hens molt and through the winter. I suggest getting some pullets that are good year-round layers, such as Leghorns, Rhode Island Reds, or some other good laying breed. Your climate may also help determine what breed or breeds you get.

    With the flock you have now, you will stop getting eggs when the hens molt (late summer or fall). And the hens may stop laying in the winter, or at least slow down their laying in the winter.
     

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