Immature singleton guinea rescue

KirbyH

Chirping
Jan 22, 2019
30
40
59
Rougemont, NC
I want to start introducing what is surely a tame guinea fowl 11 weeks old into the local neighborhood flock. I’ve been putting her in a coop and spreading millet around to attract the flock. They are interested in her and the millet. For reasons unrelated to her, I have to wait until she has her helmet to set her free so I am going slow. She isn’t fully fledged so she gets cold and cannot be left out at night, in fact I don’t keep her out long. When she’s got more feathers, I’ll let her stay out longer. Do you think she’ll integrate into the flock (it roosts at a neighbor’s) after some increasing time of being around them?

I wrote about this bird in an earlier thread. I thought, because she was hatched by a turkey, that she was a turkey. She wasn’t. The turkeys killed her three siblings and wounded her, complicating my getting her a companion. So she has been raised by hand and is somewhat attached to me. She follows me around if I am the only act in town but if she were set loose, I think she would be hard to catch. I don’t want to let her loose until there is a reasonable expectation of survival. She lives in a cage in the house when she is not in her small coop outdoors. I very much want her to survive and I’m asking for advice on the next steps.
 

R2elk

Free Ranger
Premium member
6 Years
Feb 24, 2013
11,790
36,740
1,131
Natrona County, Wyoming
I want to start introducing what is surely a tame guinea fowl 11 weeks old into the local neighborhood flock. I’ve been putting her in a coop and spreading millet around to attract the flock. They are interested in her and the millet. For reasons unrelated to her, I have to wait until she has her helmet to set her free so I am going slow. She isn’t fully fledged so she gets cold and cannot be left out at night, in fact I don’t keep her out long. When she’s got more feathers, I’ll let her stay out longer. Do you think she’ll integrate into the flock (it roosts at a neighbor’s) after some increasing time of being around them?

I wrote about this bird in an earlier thread. I thought, because she was hatched by a turkey, that she was a turkey. She wasn’t. The turkeys killed her three siblings and wounded her, complicating my getting her a companion. So she has been raised by hand and is somewhat attached to me. She follows me around if I am the only act in town but if she were set loose, I think she would be hard to catch. I don’t want to let her loose until there is a reasonable expectation of survival. She lives in a cage in the house when she is not in her small coop outdoors. I very much want her to survive and I’m asking for advice on the next steps.
Find out who owns the flock of guineas and ask them for permission before you try to add to their flock.
 

KirbyH

Chirping
Jan 22, 2019
30
40
59
Rougemont, NC
Part of their flock is ours. We had two flocks and they became one and roost at their place. That isn’t a problem. In fact this bird is the progeny of that flock. It was their turkey who hatched it out in our yard.

You can see the complications here. The turkeys came around while she was out the other day and were poking around her little coop. I don’t know what they are thinking, but I would assume as long as she is a juvenile, she’s a possible object of their aggression. They after all tried to kill her once.
 
Last edited:

R2elk

Free Ranger
Premium member
6 Years
Feb 24, 2013
11,790
36,740
1,131
Natrona County, Wyoming
Part of their flock is ours. We had two flocks and they became one and roost at their place. That isn’t a problem. In fact this bird is the progeny of that flock. It was their turkey who hatched it out in our yard.

You can see the complications here. The turkeys came around while she was out the other day and were poking around her little coop. I don’t know what they are thinking, but I would assume as long as she is a juvenile, she’s a possible object of their aggression. They after all tried to kill her once.
Turkeys can be like that. Once they get an idea in their head, they can be relentless.
 

KirbyH

Chirping
Jan 22, 2019
30
40
59
Rougemont, NC
Turkeys can be like that. Once they get an idea in their head, they can be relentless.
That is why I want her to look like the adults when she is released. If I knew of another flock where this could be accomplished, I’d give her away. I’m willing to have her pooping on my couch and trying to eat my earrings and glasses until that is possible.
 
Top Bottom