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Impacted Crop - How long to keep trying to fix?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Summerdae214, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. Summerdae214

    Summerdae214 New Egg

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    I'm hoping someone has some advice this morning. I have a 2 1/2 yr old barred rock hen who has an impacted crop. I noticed it Sunday and pulled her in the house for some TLC. I've done everything suggested in the boards: massage the crop, given her plain probiotic yogurt mixed with no sugar applesauce, put out grit coated with olive oil, she has a friend in the next cage over so she is not stressed by being alone. She is very thin, this may have been going on longer than I knew. I don't know what else to try to get things moving out of her crop, as this morning she is not even interested in the yogurt...I even tried some wet cat food but she just kept picking it up and putting it down. Is there anything else anyone can offer for me to try, or do you think this is a no-win and to put her out of her misery and to cull the bird? There are no avian vets in the area and I won't put her thru surgery at my ameture hands (esp without any pain help). Any advice is much appreciated, as this is actually the first real illness I have had in my birds so far.
     
  2. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I find message several times a day is important, and keep trying to mold it. I used olive oil as well on some bread cubes. And some loose mush made with chicken feed with some olive oil in it and water, and make it watery. If not, there are some really good instructions on this MB, at the top of this category (?). Or type in "impacted crop surgery", of you can be brave. I did this for a week, but saw results in 3-5 days, If it works, you will see the stuff in there in her stool.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  3. Summerdae214

    Summerdae214 New Egg

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    Thank you for your response. I have been putting her on my lap and closing my eyes to "feel" the crop as I massage it. I have not tried olive oil as I couldn't figure out how to get it in her. So many horror stories of liquids going into their lungs! I'll try the bread cubes soaked in olive oil. Her chicken friend jumped on my lap while I held Bella and cuddled into her. Baby knows that Bella is not feeling well, and took it in stride when Bella gave her pecks to the head.
     
  4. ChickensRDinos

    ChickensRDinos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you want to try the olive oil, get a syringe and run the liquid along the side of the beak, just a little bit at a time. You can hold her mouth open a little but the key is to make sure her head is level, not tipped back and that a small amount of liquid is going in her beak NOT in her throat - she should be allowed to swallow on her own. It will be messy.

    I am not a vet or a medical professional but I have done a successful crop surgery at home. Feel free to PM me if you feel you have gotten to that point and want to explore your options.
     
  5. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I agree. I do the same thing. I just run or dribble it on the side.
    Bread cubes with olive oil is one I like because bread dissolves so easily.
    When my Fern impacted, I figured I'd give her a week, and if she's still impacted with no improvement, I was prepared to do the surgery.
     
  6. Summerdae214

    Summerdae214 New Egg

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    Still no improvement on Bella. Husband brought out the box with the lid (he was going to euthanize her by hooking the box up to his truck exhaust and chicken would just go to sleep). When I started to cry he relented but didn't want to help with surgery. SO, I found my old vet that used to take care of my parakeets and cockatiels and am bringing Bella in to him this afternoon. He has done chickens before. Can't really afford it right now, BUT I figure if nothing else this is education for the future so I'll just put it on credit. Hopefully we can get Bella fixed all up and feeling fine again. I just hope I didn't wait too long trying other things. Keep you posted!
     
  7. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Summer, good for you!!! Crop surgery should be real easy for the vet. After my Fern cleared up with the oil and message, she never had another problem. She passed alot of dry grass and little twigs. Update, Okay?
     
  8. Summerdae214

    Summerdae214 New Egg

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    Update on Bella. I had to have her put down. The doctor was very good. He owns large birds (african grey, cockatoo) and is familiar with chickens too. He did and x-ray of her and showed me; it was pretty cool. The hen had other underlying problems such as kidney issues and her one lung looked somewhat deflated as well as a blockage further down than the crop. She did have an impacted full crop. He wanted to charge me over $400 for the surgery...which I may have considered but when my husband asked about her long term outlook the vet was honest with us that with the other issues he did not think the longterm outlook was good. Interestingly when I first brought Bella into the office, I was able to educate the vet techs on chickens and they showed an appreciation for the knowledge they gained.

    Oddly enough, when I got home, a stray beagle was on the farm. We have canvassed the neighborhood, called animal control and the shelters. My husband fell in love with this beagle and now he is in our house with his own bed and toys (cats are not too happy however) and my husband named him "Beagle Bailey". So far it doesn't look like anybody is coming forward for this dog, who is really sweet. Sometimes I think the Lord has a sense of humor....I had been looking for a shepherd puppy to fit into our household but it looks like we may be keeping a beagle, which I said I would never own. So even though I'm sad about my loss of Bella, I wound up having a new member of the family (possibly). Funny how life goes, isn't it?
     
  9. Summerdae214

    Summerdae214 New Egg

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    I want to thank everyone for the advice and encouragement with Bella. This has been a learning experience for sure! Hopefully I can help others in future.
     
  10. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I think you did the right thing and cared enough to see what was wrong. You have helped alot of people. I think some of the problem is that chickens are not bred to live long, just produce more.

    I just had xrays done on my horse's hooves, and the vet made me a copy of them on a cd. I wonder if your vet can do the same. I think we'd all love to see the xrays if possible.

    Sorry about your hen [​IMG]
     

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