In a tree

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by bikerchick, Dec 10, 2009.

  1. bikerchick

    bikerchick New Egg

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    Nov 7, 2008
    Texas
    I've had hens for two years. Got a nice little coop and a small run. Birds free range during the day. My neighbor loved the look and with no thought, went out and bought himself a dozen hens. He's down to two. He makes no effort to feed, so with his permission (I'd have done it anyway), I started providing for his girls.

    The problem: His girls roost high in a tree in his yard. This is their first winter. I didn't worry too much, I live in Texas, after all, but the last two nights it's gotten down in the teens. The bigger problem: I just had a hysterectomy last week and I can't go after the birds. Could they possibly survive this without getting frostbite? I'd make my neighbor climb up and get them but he's not home. Is it worth tracking someone down to climb a ladder into that tree? There are no leaves on the tree, i.e. no protection for the girls. Appreciate your advice, opinion, etc.
     
  2. rcentner

    rcentner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I sm Sure that the chickens will survive the nights outdoors in Texas as mine survive the nights here just fine without anything but wind barrier. Don't over do it after your histerectomy, you also have to believe that the chickens have some knowledge of what is good for them. As long as there are no predators lurking in the night to get them they will be fine. But watch out for coyotes and fox (if iin your area), good luck
     
  3. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 6, 2009
    Well here is what I would do is to wait until morning because its to late to rescue them now but tommorow, considering you are already feeding them I would try to buy them off of your neighbor and absorb them into your flock so they can sleep in a coop and get fed
     
  4. Andi

    Andi Chillin' With My Peeps

    I like BarredBuff's idea although I wouldn't offer to buy them but instead offer a portion of the eggs they produce. (Keeps good neighborly relations going on, assuming your neighbor realizes there will be times of the year the egg production may stop, like during molting.) A half a dozen eggs per week should be reasonable, especially seeing your neighbor isn't getting any eggs right now with them being loose. Just a thought. You know your neighbor better than us.

    I wouldn't worry about the cold. I'm up in Minnesota and my chickens don't seem bothered in the least with temps well below freezing. Of course, I know mine are well fed and have fresh water at all times. Its kind of hard monitoring that in birds that are hanging out in trees.
     
  5. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 6, 2009
    Even though I put buy the chickens Andi's idea about offering a portion of the eggs sounds better to me
     
  6. bikerchick

    bikerchick New Egg

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    Nov 7, 2008
    Texas
    Thank you for your replies. My neighbor already gifted me with the birds, I just didn't get a chance to incorporate them into my flock before my surgery (which wasn't planned). There is no wind tonight, but I was still worried because it's expected to drop to 15 degrees. I feel much better after hearing your responses and will make plans to have someone snag them tomorrow when they go to roost. [​IMG]
     
  7. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 6, 2009
    I am glad he gave them to you, all animals need a good home
     
  8. doublebow

    doublebow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 13, 2009
    I live in Texas too and have been worried the last couple of nights but mine chose to sleep in the part of the coop that has little protection instead of the part that is draft-free and dry. Go figure. They are all fine, anyway.
     

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